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redleaf101

Little Trip To Joggins (March 2013)

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redleaf101    4
redleaf101

From my blog post http://redleafz.blogspot.ca/2013/04/joggins-march-2013.html

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I had been cooped up for a few months and the last few weeks of winter had been brutal health wise. I thought at one point I was having cabin fever symptoms. A few weekends ago I had taken a nice little drive in the Cape Enraged (New Brunswick) at the end of my bout with a nasty flu. The weather had been a little bit better and the Sun was actually gonna make an apparition for much of the weekend, so there was no way I would stay at home and not partake in a little road trip!

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I drove South to Joggins for a short road trip. By the time I would get there, low tide would have already started to turn. I hit the beach at about 8:30am and it was a little bit nippy, especially in the shadow of the cliffs. Big chunks of ice were hanging high and melting, causing sediment to fall in big heaps at the foot of the cliffs. I had a few hours of wandering on the beach before it became too dangerous with the Sun bearing down on the ice.

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The trees that were familiar to me from last year were practically all gone, either buried in sediment, or carried away by the force of the tides. There was a few that had escaped destruction, for the time being anyways. But with all this weathering and grinding of the rocks by Mother Nature, lots of new material surfaced on the beach. New plants, animals, and trackways littered the beach. I didn't stick around too long, but I did take a few pics here and there.

Joggins was a little trip to get me going. I'll probably hit the Blomidon area next to see what secrets the beaches have dug up.

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Cross bedding

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Calamite

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Water channel

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One of the few remaining trees

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AgrilusHunter    44
AgrilusHunter

"But with all this weathering and grinding of the rocks by Mother Nature, lots of new material surfaced on the beach. New plants, animals, and trackways littered the beach."

Looks like it's time to head north, you'll clearly need help collecting all those lovely new fossils. ;)

Nice report, I wish you good luck in the comoing season!

Edited by AgrilusHunter

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redleaf101    4
redleaf101

Me too! Me its the little critters in my home province that's calling my name.. "find me! find me!".. I'll be discovering some new areas this year for sure. You'll know all about it. =P

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Plantguy    196
Plantguy

Keenan, does look a little chilly! Love seeing the sea cliffs and the details of the beds...Finding a Calamites and a tree just adds to the fun! Thanks for sharing. Regards, Chris

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dmzeidler    0
dmzeidler

Collecting is prohibited at Joggins and as far as I can tell, anywhere in NS, without a permit:

https://museum.novascotia.ca/about-nsm/about-heritage/special-places-protection-act

There are currently six protected sites in Nova Scotia: Joggins Fossil Cliffs; Parrsboro Fossil Site; Debert Palaeo-Indian Site; Fletcher Lock (Shubenacadie Canal); Port Morien Old French Coal Mine; and, Belleisle.

Palaeontology Permits and Guidelines

It is against the law to excavate or collection fossils in Nova Scotia without a Heritage Research Permit. The permit system is in place to make sure that:

  • Individuals excavating fossils are qualified to do the work;

  • The excavation is well planned;

  • Any recovered fossils are properly studied and cared for;

  • A report about the work conducted is drafted and submitted to the provincial repository for future use by researchers, educators and the general public.

It is an amazing trip to make, but painful for a collector.

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redleaf101    4
redleaf101

Yup it is. But still worth it to take the trip. It is against the law to remove fossils from these said so sites. It is also against the law to remove fossils that are in situ, in the cliffs, in that province without a permit. But otherwise, therein lies the grey area.

Nova Scotia is making it difficult, not impossible, but difficult to contribute to the field of paleontology or inciting people by having these huge hurdles. I can see the point in well protected areas and also for important finds, but they should also trust regular people to bring in wonderful finds to light and saving them from certain doom.

Nova Scotia needs to revise their collecting laws.

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