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MFowler

Anyone Know How To Find A Map Of Creeks In Dfw?

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MFowler

In this new addiction of mine, that you people call fossil hunting, I am incapable of driving by a creek without wondering if it has potential for fossils. If I knew the name of it then I could do a little research, but a lot of the creeks around Dallas and Collin counties don't have those nice little signs telling you the name of that enticing creek you're about to drive over. I tried going on the "Inter-Web" and can find plenty of maps showing Texas rivers and lakes...but no creeks.

Here's my plan; (and please tell me if there's a better way because this is pure rookie logic here)

1) Make a list of all the large creeks that I see where there has been a lot of erosion making them nice and deep therefore exposing older ground.

2) Cross reference each creek with a map of the local geology to see if it may be in a fertile area.

3) Check online to see if there's been any previous searches there. If so, where, when, and how successful.

4) If nobody appears to have explored it (or if they have with results) and the geology is right, then it's time to go get muddy.

I think I have a pretty good plan, but I'm stuck at step #1 because I need to know the name of the creek, but more importantly where it runs. Some of the creeks around DFW are really long and may not be in a fertile area where I spot it, but that doesn't mean part of it doesn't cut right through precious dirt.

ANY help is greatly appreciated!

If you can't help with the map, I would love to have any input regarding 'my plan' as well.

Thanks everyone,

-Mark

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Uncle Siphuncle

creek names are on the geomap. i'm guessing that you'll have trouble finding productivity reports by creek online. you'll learn the most by entering the creek and making first hand observations....good thing that's the fun part.

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MFowler

creek names are on the geomap. i'm guessing that you'll have trouble finding productivity reports by creek online. you'll learn the most by entering the creek and making first hand observations....good thing that's the fun part.

Yeah, that's what I thought. As far as researching, I found the name of the creek that runs behind my office (White Rock Creek) and Googled it and apparently a lot of people have looked but seems all anyone finds are shells. It's in the Austin formation (need to look up what that means) and is the main tributary to White Rock Lake. The one's that really intrigue me are the creeks I drove by on the way to the NSR because I'm pretty sure that's fertile ground. I know some people have checked there with mixed results (mostly frustration)...but hey, they're not as determined as I am :-) Besides, if I drive an hour, get covered in mud, dodge a few Cotton Mouths, get yelled at by a land owner (at gunpoint), and get zero fossils...hell...sounds like a pretty snarge good day to me :-)

Thanks Dan

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sward

You might try the "bridgehunter" website. http://bridgehunter.com/tx/dallas/map/

You can also look at some of the surrounding counties as well.

However, I have more fun just stopping at a bridge and getting down in the creek and seeing what I can find. If I find some good stuff, or maybe want to check it out again, then I'll do the research to see what formation its in, etc.

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MFowler

You might try the "bridgehunter" website. http://bridgehunter.com/tx/dallas/map/

You can also look at some of the surrounding counties as well.

However, I have more fun just stopping at a bridge and getting down in the creek and seeing what I can find. If I find some good stuff, or maybe want to check it out again, then I'll do the research to see what formation its in, etc.

Good idea...that sounds more fun. Thanks for the link, I'll check it out.

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mikecable

The USGS site has free downloadable topographic maps, as well as historic topo maps. Much greater detail than the Geologic Atlas of Texas. I've used the historical maps to help decipher site data from old scientific papers.

http://store.usgs.gov/b2c_usgs/b2c/start/(xcm=r3standardpitrex_prd)/.do

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mikecable

You might want to read this article

http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/publications/nonpwdpubs/water_issues/rivers/navigation/kennedy/kennedy_faq.phtml

and also Google Texas navigable waters.

Accessing streams can fall into a fairly gray area of Texas law. I personally would never argue with anyone armed (law enforcement or civilian), even if I knew myself to be in the right.

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sward

You might want to read this article

http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/publications/nonpwdpubs/water_issues/rivers/navigation/kennedy/kennedy_faq.phtml

and also Google Texas navigable waters.

Accessing streams can fall into a fairly gray area of Texas law. I personally would never argue with anyone armed (law enforcement or civilian), even if I knew myself to be in the right.

Thanks Mike! That's just the information I've been looking for.

I got ran out of a creek last year by a couple of deputies. As you said, I wasn't about to argue "navigable waterway" with them. They didn't seem to be in the mood.

Thanks again.

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MFowler

The USGS site has free downloadable topographic maps, as well as historic topo maps. Much greater detail than the Geologic Atlas of Texas. I've used the historical maps to help decipher site data from old scientific papers.

http://store.usgs.gov/b2c_usgs/b2c/start/(xcm=r3standardpitrex_prd)/.do

You might want to read this article

http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/publications/nonpwdpubs/water_issues/rivers/navigation/kennedy/kennedy_faq.phtml

and also Google Texas navigable waters.

Accessing streams can fall into a fairly gray area of Texas law. I personally would never argue with anyone armed (law enforcement or civilian), even if I knew myself to be in the right.

Great stuff Mike...thanks. Ya'll never seem to come up short when I through a question out there. Thanks

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sward

Mark,

While doing more research, I came across an interesting website for topo maps that will include creek names as you had requested. The website is:

http://www.mytopo.com/index.cfm

Click on the "Start Your Custom Map" button.

Enter your area of interest in the "Search for" box.

Click the "Next" button.

The red box that appears on the map can be moved around to position it where desired.

Once you have it positioned as desired, click the "View a Full Map Preview" button.

Here's a quick sample I made of the Plano area:

post-6450-0-17881900-1368300208_thumb.jpg

This looks like it will be a valuable website for me. I've already saved it to my favorites.

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MFowler

Mark,

While doing more research, I came across an interesting website for topo maps that will include creek names as you had requested. The website is:

http://www.mytopo.com/index.cfm

Click on the "Start Your Custom Map" button.

Enter your area of interest in the "Search for" box.

Click the "Next" button.

The red box that appears on the map can be moved around to position it where desired.

Once you have it positioned as desired, click the "View a Full Map Preview" button.

Here's a quick sample I made of the Plano area:

attachicon.gifPlano Topo-Creeks.jpg

This looks like it will be a valuable website for me. I've already saved it to my favorites.

sward,

That's fantastic! Thanks I really appreciate it! I haven't been on here in a while and jumped on to check in...glad I did. I've still been going to the NSR exclusively and have a couple spots now that appear to be mine...as of now anyway. Never see any other footprints and have over 50 shark teeth and a lot of unidentified bone...a few appear to be Mosasaur. Hope all is well, and thanks again for your help.

Mark

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vellis

Mark,

A few ideas for you.

1) take a look at post oak creek in Sherman, it has many shark teeth.

2) for geologic data - if you do not already have Google Earth, you may want to get it, and then go to this site and get the txgeol kml or kmz file. It is an overlay file made by USGS that shows the boundaries of the geologic formations in Texas http://mrdata.usgs.gov/geology/state/state.php?state=TX

You can also find the USGS maps of Texas online.

One area that can be very productive is the places where the austin chalk and eagle ford shale meet. Creeks that run through this area can be very productive. Post Oak creek is one example.

And yes it is an addiction!!

Van

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vertman

One area that can be very productive is the places where the austin chalk and eagle ford shale meet. Creeks that run through this area can be very productive. Post Oak creek is one example.

If I may offer a slight add-on to vellis comments...The very lowermost part of the Austin Group is a shale called the Basal Atco Formation. It is I believe technically still a part of the Austin Group. In the Midlothian quarries is is a beautiful gray shale filled with dark black phosphatic pebbles and shark teeth. This shale immediately overlies the Arcadia Park shale from the Eagle Ford Group. The upper part of the Eagle Ford has some fossils in it but the hugely productive fossil sites such as Post Oak Creek and the Midlothian quarries produce tons of shark teeth coming from the Basal Atco. This formation is one of the greatest things about living in north Texas. Actually there are many great things about living in north Texas...

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bone2stone

If I may offer a slight add-on to vellis comments...The very lowermost part of the Austin Group is a shale called the Basal Atco Formation. It is I believe technically still a part of the Austin Group. In the Midlothian quarries is is a beautiful gray shale filled with dark black phosphatic pebbles and shark teeth. This shale immediately overlies the Arcadia Park shale from the Eagle Ford Group. The upper part of the Eagle Ford has some fossils in it but the hugely productive fossil sites such as Post Oak Creek and the Midlothian quarries produce tons of shark teeth coming from the Basal Atco. This formation is one of the greatest things about living in north Texas. Actually there are many great things about living in north Texas...

Check!!!

It is one of the things that make livin here tolerable.

Jess B.

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MFowler

Mark,

A few ideas for you.

1) take a look at post oak creek in Sherman, it has many shark teeth.

2) for geologic data - if you do not already have Google Earth, you may want to get it, and then go to this site and get the txgeol kml or kmz file. It is an overlay file made by USGS that shows the boundaries of the geologic formations in Texas http://mrdata.usgs.gov/geology/state/state.php?state=TX

You can also find the USGS maps of Texas online.

One area that can be very productive is the places where the austin chalk and eagle ford shale meet. Creeks that run through this area can be very productive. Post Oak creek is one example.

And yes it is an addiction!!

Van

If I may offer a slight add-on to vellis comments...The very lowermost part of the Austin Group is a shale called the Basal Atco Formation. It is I believe technically still a part of the Austin Group. In the Midlothian quarries is is a beautiful gray shale filled with dark black phosphatic pebbles and shark teeth. This shale immediately overlies the Arcadia Park shale from the Eagle Ford Group. The upper part of the Eagle Ford has some fossils in it but the hugely productive fossil sites such as Post Oak Creek and the Midlothian quarries produce tons of shark teeth coming from the Basal Atco. This formation is one of the greatest things about living in north Texas. Actually there are many great things about living in north Texas...

Thanks guys, I've been meaning to check out Post Oak Creek for a couple months now but whenever I get a day to fossil hunt (almost every Sunday for two months now) I can't stop going to the NSR. I've fallen in love with that place! People keep telling me that it's too picked over, but I haven't felt like that once...I think it depends on where you go. It's taken a lot of time and leg work (literally), but I've got 3 spots where I go and I'm finding A LOT of good stuff.

Once I found my first shark tooth, after 3 full day trips of coming home empty handed, I swear it's like they find me now :-) I'll bring home around ten partial or full shark teeth (at least) even when I'm not really looking for them. I know I can find the teeth if I really want to, so I've been trying to practice looking for bone the last three or four trips...but I still keep finding a bunch of teeth in the process...but finding teeth NEVER gets old for me :-) Now that I'm getting better at spotting bone I'm starting to find a lot of that as well. Yesterday, I went out there because the river swelled to almost 17 ft after the storms last week (thanks to sward for the NOAA link) and was all the way back down to just over 2 ft and I found several verts and an odd shaped piece of bone that's about the size of a softball! Know idea what it's from...but something BIG! I'm gonna post pictures so you all can hopefully tell me what it's from, but it seems abnormally large bone for the NSR...I almost walked right past it because I thought my eyes were deceiving me.

Anyway, I definitely wanna check out other spots, but the NSR is like my own personal "Zen Garden" now :-) Heck, one of my favorite things is the drive out there. Then, once I'm in the riverbed and the only things I hear are birds chirping and trickling water (no cars & no people in site or earshot)...it's like my own little slice of heaven :-)

Thanks for all ya'lls help and I can't wait to post some pics so you can see what I've been pulling outta there...but mainly to find out just what that big bone is from :-)

Mark

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MFowler

post-11298-0-95741200-1369834865_thumb.jpgpost-11298-0-16539200-1369834868_thumb.jpgpost-11298-0-59724600-1369834870_thumb.jpgpost-11298-0-78994900-1369834872_thumb.jpg

Here's the bone I was telling you about. Any idea what it is? All I can tell ya is that it's bone...and big.

Thanks in advance for the help guys,

Mark


If I may offer a slight add-on to vellis comments...The very lowermost part of the Austin Group is a shale called the Basal Atco Formation. It is I believe technically still a part of the Austin Group. In the Midlothian quarries is is a beautiful gray shale filled with dark black phosphatic pebbles and shark teeth. This shale immediately overlies the Arcadia Park shale from the Eagle Ford Group. The upper part of the Eagle Ford has some fossils in it but the hugely productive fossil sites such as Post Oak Creek and the Midlothian quarries produce tons of shark teeth coming from the Basal Atco. This formation is one of the greatest things about living in north Texas. Actually there are many great things about living in north Texas...

Mark,

A few ideas for you.

1) take a look at post oak creek in Sherman, it has many shark teeth.
2) for geologic data - if you do not already have Google Earth, you may want to get it, and then go to this site and get the txgeol kml or kmz file. It is an overlay file made by USGS that shows the boundaries of the geologic formations in Texas http://mrdata.usgs.gov/geology/state/state.php?state=TX

You can also find the USGS maps of Texas online.

One area that can be very productive is the places where the austin chalk and eagle ford shale meet. Creeks that run through this area can be very productive. Post Oak creek is one example.

And yes it is an addiction!!

Van

Mark,

While doing more research, I came across an interesting website for topo maps that will include creek names as you had requested. The website is:

http://www.mytopo.com/index.cfm

Click on the "Start Your Custom Map" button.

Enter your area of interest in the "Search for" box.

Click the "Next" button.

The red box that appears on the map can be moved around to position it where desired.

Once you have it positioned as desired, click the "View a Full Map Preview" button.

Here's a quick sample I made of the Plano area:

attachicon.gifPlano Topo-Creeks.jpg

This looks like it will be a valuable website for me. I've already saved it to my favorites.

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