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Missourian

Microfossil Miscellanea?

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Missourian

Certain microfossils -- forams, ostracods, conodonts -- are abundant and are readily found and collected.

Other types tend to be less common and/or obscure. These include sponge spicules, holothurian sclerites, scolecodonts, charophytes, etc. I would also include really tiny fossils such as radiolarians and diatoms. Has anyone else found any of these?

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Herb

I have Ord. scolecodonts, Miss. and Cretaceous sponge spicules and Silurian charophytes.

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Acryzona

I've got some Ordovician and Devonian scolecodonts. Hoping to find some more this year as I dissolve more limestone. Radiolarians and diatoms are too fine for my equipment. I met Rumi (TFF member) last year and he collects diatoms. Unfortunately, I haven't seen him on TFF for a while.

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Herb

I've never looked for radiolarians and diatoms. What kind of magnification are we looking at here?

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Missourian

I've never looked for radiolarians and diatoms. What kind of magnification are we looking at here?

I'm kind of curious about diatoms myself. I've had a chunk of diatomite from California for several years, but I haven't yet bothered to examine bits of it under the scope.

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Missourian

Has anyone had luck finding holothurian sclerites?

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Acryzona

Haven't tried looking for holothurian sclerites but haven't read that they are found in my samples plus the challenge of knowing what to look for. I remember the first time I was searching for forams in the Vincentown, I passed over aggulinated forams for a couple of days before I realized what they were! LOL

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Herb

Here is a collection of mini-micro specimens I found in the Finis Shale at the Jacksboro. Texas site. Pennsylvanian in age. A mixed bag of brachiopods, pelecypods, ostracods, urchin spines, gastropods, coral, worm tubes, bryozoans, and other weird stuff I haven't ID'd yet.

post-2520-0-69347200-1366569438_thumb.jpg

Edited by Herb

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Bullsnake

Love it, Herb!

What size are the cells on your display card?

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Herb

Love it, Herb!

What size are the cells on your display card?

Thanks.

I use $.50 coin holders, and customized the background sheets to fit my needs with Excel, then print them on a laser printer. You can make the cells any size you want. I like to pick out anything interesting in the matrix. The squares are about 3mm on a side. Regular microfossil slides are too small for my needs. Also you can reverse the image and print a black background for light colored fossils. The coin boxes are about 2" x 2.5" with a snap lid. They really work well and cost only about a buck. You can find more info in my 2 posts on Hunting microfossils without breaking the bank,

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ted coulianos

Has anyone had luck finding holothurian sclerites?

2r6fzgh.jpgimages are not as crisp as I would have liked; magnification is ~30x; relatively uncommon in the matrix I had. The latice-like sclerites are siliceous in nature & are every bit as fragile as they look.

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Acryzona

Thanks for posting a photo - now I know what to look for under the scope!

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Herb

Thanks for posting a photo - now I know what to look for under the scope!

Me too.

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Missourian

images are not as crisp as I would have liked; magnification is ~30x; relatively uncommon in the matrix I had. The latice-like sclerites are siliceous in nature & are every bit as fragile as they look.

Nice. As they are siliceous, did you extract them with acid?

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Rumi

For those interested in diatoms, I'd like to recommend the group diatom-forum on Yahoo:

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/diatom_forum/info

I started this group some years ago, and we now have over 100 members, mostly amateur hobbyists, and most seriously interested in fossil diatoms -- especially of the marine Miocene. Feel free to have a look!

Rumi

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Canadawest

Certain microfossils -- forams, ostracods, conodonts -- are abundant and are readily found and collected.

Other types tend to be less common and/or obscure. These include sponge spicules, holothurian sclerites, scolecodonts, charophytes, etc. I would also include really tiny fossils such as radiolarians and diatoms. Has anyone else found any of these?

Its not that some microfossils are less common as much as what fossils are most useful in doing biostratigraphy. I have hundreds of slides mounted with conodonts, ostracods and, to a lesser extent, foraminifera. The others you mention, hardly any. This is because in paleozoic studies certain fossil groups are much more diagnostic. One can compare 'conodont zones'. The same with macro fossils...for every paper on tabulate corals there are tweny on rugose corals because rugose corals have subtle changes that can be followed through the stages of the Permian, etc.

Re diatoms...many are quite incredible. Not only interesting scientifically but spectacular specimens of Nature's artwork.

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HFVC Fossils

And the hair of primitive man in box 49?

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