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Bev

BluffCountryFossils.com is a website devoted to everything fossils in southeast Minnesota!

Identification, hunting, prepping, jewelry making and crafts with fossils, children's and teachers' resource page, and a blog to keep it fresh!

Bev :)

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Wrangellian

I havent seen it all but looks pretty good Bev, a good starting point for beginners. It will only get better as you add more to it.

I'd like to get a closer look at that complete Receptaculites!

BTW the latest figures for the Ordovician period (not era - the Paleozoic is an era) are 485 to 443 mya - that is until they revise it again... :wacko: You might include a basic timescale to help put that into context for people who might like that, unless you already did and I missed it!

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Bev

Thanks Wrangellian!

The timescale is a GREAT idea! I have one on my display at the Regional Tourism Center.

What is the difference between an Era and a Period?

And why are they changing the dates?

I was asked to design a site for beginners and kids. I have more pages that I need to work on. And the ID pics are going to be very important.

The fossil hunting adventure blog is the fun part! I just added another site to the fossil trail. Where not to look-- :) The hunts and the finds. That is where I can add pictures galore! Kind of like the Fossil Hunts Forum. And, hopefully, eventually others will email me with their adventures and finds to post.

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Nandomas

Today I will add your web link to my website :) congrats, Nando

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piranha

...What is the difference between an Era and a Period?

...And why are they changing the dates?

The difference is a Period defines a smaller chunk of time. The timeline adjustments reflect advancements in the multitude of applied methodologies of radiometrics, chronostratigraphy, deterministic orbital tuning plus cyclic rubber-banding of stages, direct dating, stratigraphic reasoning and magnetostratigraphic interpolation. One of the resulting achievements of GTS2012 is about 30 million years of 'missing' Triassic is in process of a thorough update. Objectively the goal is increasingly precise data and a narrowing of undefined blocks of time. The latest revisions were eight years in the making but provide a better 'high resolution' snapshot for scientists. The analogy is on par with new models of cars, computers or surgical instruments, as research and technologies are continually evolving and improving. The final chapter is never written...

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Bev

Today I will add your web link to my website :) congrats, Nando

Thanks Nandomas!

And thanks Piranha on the explanation! :)

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Wrangellian

Another way of saying it is an era is made up of multiple periods, for example the Paleozoic Era is comprised of the Cambrian, Ordovician, Silurian, Devonian, Carboniferous (=Mississippian+Pennsylvanian) and Permian Periods.

Periods are further divided into Epochs, and Epochs into Ages. And Eras are grouped into Eons.

Check out my timescales under 'Documents' if you'd like to delve deeper into it.

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