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garyc

Hello all. I'm new to the forum and have enjoyed reading everyone's posts. Great info. I'm southwest of Houston in Richmond and have had several successful outings on the Brazos....teeth and bones. Found a really nice vertebra last outing, but not sure what it's from. Does anyone hunt along the Colorado, Trinity or San Jacinto rivers. If so what can be found and where are good access points. I'm looking for good day trips around this area. Thanks

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tracer

post a picture of the vert and someone may know what it is. the almost-six-million population of the houston metro area isn't conducive to great outings nearby, particularly at "good access points". the further out into the boonies you end up, the better the odds that you won't just find footprints of others. it also pays to study up on geology some and figure out where the right formations are. large areas of the coastal plain are simply sandy or silty with little or nothing to be found.

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Auspex

And if you're out in the boonies and see a guy in a fool's cap, it's probably OK to make eye-contact. Maybe. :P

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garyc

i've tried uploading pics of the vert, but can't figure out how. it says i have a 2MB limit to upload pics to this site, but all the pics i take are around 4.8MB. any suggestions?

EDIT: The resulting post has been moved to the Fossil ID forum.

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MikeD

Use a photo editing software, such as Irfanview (which you can download for free), crop your photo to primarily show the fossil (if needed), and then re-size your photo to around 800x600. That should reduce the size enough to upload.

I've been looking at those rivers myself.

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garyc

Mike, which rivers have you been looking at? And have you had any luck?

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MikeD

I've been to the Brazos a couple of times. Thinking about hitting the San Jacinto and Colorado. Lack of time, weather, trip logistics are all in my way right now.

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garyc

Cool. I've been to the Brazos with HGMS, to Whiskey Bridge and the canoe trip around San Felipe. I've been going out since on foot or in my canoe where ever I can gain access. I've tried looking for good spots with google maps, but it seems like most of the spots I want to check out end up on private property. Haven't ventured w/ my canoe on any other rivers yet, but would like to.

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tracer

not sure what your experience level is with your canoe, and whether you're doing all your stuff alone. if you haven't done much moving water with your canoe then i would suggest you team up with somebody who has in order to try to benefit from their experience to make things somewhat safer.

i use an ultimately maneuverable, short, roto-molded kayak, study the weather and the streamflow like crazy, talk myself out of probably half of the things i think about doing, and still have gotten in enough trouble to make me cringe when i think about it. i've obviously considered using a canoe, because they're dryer (maybe), have more storage, etc. but omg, if i'd been in a canoe in some of the circumstances i've found myself in, it would have been a beeg problem.

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garyc

Agreed. There's definitely a learning curve. Was recently with my wife not planning on going very far. Quickly realized we were being blown upstream and the difficulty would be paddling back down stream. Dug a little too hard to get turned downstream and......Fortunately, my wife who does not swim was wearing a vest. I was able to right the canoe once I could pry her off me. Quite an adventure. Water gets a little chilly in January. I've gone alone with it, but again, very short trip. Probably dragged the canoe on land farther than I paddled. Definitely easier and more fun with someone.

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tracer

well, if you're getting blown upstream then you're kinda in a bathtub compared to lots of places. the bad thing is when you're moving quasi-rapidly downstream in water that you are not physically able to paddle upstream in for very long if at all and you're being carried into a bunch of different dicey puzzles at a rate that does not suit your disposition, data-processing speed, nor experience level. the only good thing about being alone in this situation is that nobody can hear you futilely screaming "time out! time out!"

that's when it starts raining...

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Nandomas

You can't go wrong in Canyon Lake area...just slow down and look closely.

Never been there in C.L.

Speaking of good access, how is the situation of the gravel bars at SSR south east of Commerce? It's a lot of time (6 years) that I don't hit that river.

Regards

Nando

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MikeD

Cool. I've been to the Brazos with HGMS, to Whiskey Bridge and the canoe trip around San Felipe.

If you've been on that trip, then we know each other. We will have to put our heads together for the next river attack. We can talk about it more at the next Paleo meeting.

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garyc

Mike, when is the next meeting. i'm always bad about remembering and then actually making time to attend.

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MikeD

Mike, when is the next meeting. i'm always bad about remembering and then actually making time to attend.

Tomorrow (Tuesday 02/15/11) 7:30 p.m.

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Technologicaldreamer

Has anyone had any luck just finding shark teeth on the beaches in Corpus Christi?Ive gone there for years and I have not once found a single tooth!!A friend of mine told me you have to cheeck 4am in the morning before the tide comes in.

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MikeD

I don;t know about Corpus, but in Galveston, I have had luck looking near low tide and as the tide is going out (whenever that is, because it is not always at 4 am) and looking along the water line as the waves come in and out. Especially in the shell hash. If you see other people doing the same thing, they are looking, too.

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Technologicaldreamer

I don;t know about Corpus, but in Galveston, I have had luck looking near low tide and as the tide is going out (whenever that is, because it is not always at 4 am) and looking along the water line as the waves come in and out. Especially in the shell hash. If you see other people doing the same thing, they are looking, too.

I built a strainer for something like this I was gonna take. I figured ill get a shovel and just start digging and see what i can find. I figured they were always buried beneath the sand which was why i never found them. I try to check a couple of feet out in the water and just use my feet to feel for anything too.

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MikeD

A strainer could also work. I have used one in Venice, Florida where there were a lot more teeth. I got kind of frustrated with it at Galveston though. It was easier to watch the water line as the waves pulled back and occasionally exposed them.

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Technologicaldreamer

A strainer could also work. I have used one in Venice, Florida where there were a lot more teeth. I got kind of frustrated with it at Galveston though. It was easier to watch the water line as the waves pulled back and occasionally exposed them.

lol well i hope i have more luck with the strainer cause nothing else is working for me so far. I guess I just dont have the eye for them or they just dont stand out all that well.

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boonxeven

Near Bend -- The Pennsylvanian, Smithwick Formation shales produce a fair number of cephalopods, ammonites and nicely detailed trilobites. This site is for the more dedicated collector as finding good specimens requires using a rock hammer and chisels to split the shale layers. Go west out of Lampasas on Route 580 to Bend. Cross the Colorado river into Bend, make a right and go approx.1/2 mile until you see the white ME ranch fence on the left. The site is across the street down a short unobstructed rocky drive to the river (about 100 meters). The black shale weathers to tan and is easy to spot. Look for the easiest areas near the river bank.

This spot is only about an hour and a half from me, I'm definitely going to plan a trip there soon. Thanks for the tip.

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Auspex

This spot is only about an hour and a half from me, I'm definitely going to plan a trip there soon. Thanks for the tip.

Check it out for sure, but be prepared for possible changes, as the info given was pretty old when it was posted.

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Sebazen

My first post here - thanks to all who have posted advice and suggested locations.

I only got interested a couple years ago when I moved to Texas and just stumbled across a bunch of fossils when I was hiking.

I followed a link ( http://www.txroadrunners.com/RockHoundPages/TexasRockHuntingSites/TexasHillCountry/GatesvilleFossils.htm ) recently, and was lucky enough to find a number of fossils, one of which was about 5" tall! Can anybody tell me if it is indeed and ammonite? The photo can be seen:

http://phostructor.deviantart.com/gallery/#/d4wxfli

I am hoping someone can point me towards info about legalities of fossil hunting in such road cuts. After I'd sweated and struggled up and down a hill for hours, a farmer came by and basically said I was on his property. I expressed my belief that there was some public right of way, and he said I couldn't go up the hill but could only look in the gully by the road. At the top of the hill I had found a fence, and assumed that was the property line. Do anyone know if I was actually trespassing?

(The guy also made comments about how he and his kids liked to hunt the spot, so I figured he was just accustomed to thinking of the place as his....)

Thanks in advance for any input.

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BobWill

That's an ammonite alright, maybe an Oxytropidoceras sp.

Road cuts vary with the location. Generaly you're OK if you stay in the right-of-way which can be a different width for state, county and city roads. Best to check with whatever authority has responsibility for maintenance on the road.

The article says 20 miles east on 207 which puts you in lower cretaceous stratta where oxys are found in Coryell, Bell and McLennan Counties.

Bob

Edited by BobWill

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Sebazen

Thank you so much Bob! Appreciate the advice to check with who ever runs the road.

Now that I am certain my fossil wasn't just a rusting vent hose stuck in the mud, I am really excited to continue the hunt for more.

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