kwmpiercb

Cape Breton Fossils

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Here are some pictures of some the fossils to found around Cape Breton Islandpost-11348-0-60968200-1368535995_thumb.jpgpost-11348-0-71043800-1368536006_thumb.jpgpost-11348-0-27549100-1368536010_thumb.jpgpost-11348-0-82727100-1368536012_thumb.jpgpost-11348-0-49351300-1368536018_thumb.jpg

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I will be posting more shortly.

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Wonderful fossils!

Can't wait to see more.

Thanks for posting them.

Regards,

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Love the stump! And everything else, wonderful preservation!

Cheers

Ash.

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That Sigillaria trunk in place is unreal! Wow! Thanks for sharing all of the photos! Would love to be able to run around and see that stuff! Regards, Chris

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That is amazing stuff! The Sigillaria stump, simply amazing! Annularia and the other plants, that's some wonderful stuff!

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Wonderful pics. Unbelievable preservation of those "trees". Thanks for sharing them.

I had to opportunity to visit Cape Breton many years ago while visiting the coal mines for the CBDC. Unfortunately, I spent most of my time underground and never had to opportunity to go "sight seeing".

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Nice stuff. I like that Annularia and the ferns, but that stump is amazing. I hope somebody is thinking about preserving it from the elements somehow - whether that involves moving it to a museum, so be it. Cant be very many of them to be found!

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Very impressive! Are those things from a protected area or are you allowed to collect them?

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The fossils in the area of Sydney as far as I know are not under a Protected Places Act but all fossils found in Nova Scotia are considered property of the Government. You are not allowed to remove fossils from situ unless under a permit. Collecting fossils that have fallen from the cliff face or found in coal mine spoils has not been prohibited as far as I know but significant finds or what could be deemed as an important find have to be reported. If anyone else has any info on this topic in Nova Scotia I would be interested in hearing.

This tree will not be preserved, it will fall to the shoreline of the harbour and erode pretty quickly. This particular spot has exposed around four trees over the years and each has fallen and eroded away. The stigmaria is still attached pretty solidly to the host rock, but it too will erode. Each spring here exposes new exposures or takes older ones away, keeps thing interesting.

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I am not a fan of laws that cause fossils to erode away.

I guess you do not have a permit.. could you get one, or is that reserved for professional scientists, who never seem to be numerous/funded enough to even gather every significant fossil?

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The fossils in the area of Sydney as far as I know are not under a Protected Places Act but all fossils found in Nova Scotia are considered property of the Government. You are not allowed to remove fossils from situ unless under a permit. Collecting fossils that have fallen from the cliff face or found in coal mine spoils has not been prohibited as far as I know but significant finds or what could be deemed as an important find have to be reported. If anyone else has any info on this topic in Nova Scotia I would be interested in hearing.

This tree will not be preserved, it will fall to the shoreline of the harbour and erode pretty quickly. This particular spot has exposed around four trees over the years and each has fallen and eroded away. The stigmaria is still attached pretty solidly to the host rock, but it too will erode. Each spring here exposes new exposures or takes older ones away, keeps thing interesting.

Thanks for the info. From what you're saying, you could theoretically take that tree home as soon as it slips down the slope.

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Yup. Trees are so important to recover since some have been known to bear vertebrate bones, such as in Joggins, NS.

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Yup. Trees are so important to recover since some have been known to bear vertebrate bones, such as in Joggins, NS.

Good to hear that some people are saving some things from erosion and for posterity.

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post-11348-0-24397300-1371933193_thumb.jpgpost-11348-0-26776700-1371933212_thumb.jpgpost-11348-0-20459100-1371933229_thumb.jpgpost-11348-0-34554400-1371933243_thumb.jpgpost-11348-0-04424900-1371933259_thumb.jpgpost-11348-0-91408400-1371933277_thumb.jpgpost-11348-0-70114500-1371933311_thumb.jpgpost-11348-0-01780400-1371933331_thumb.jpg

Some pics of the tree, and of an area nearby where I found a mariopteris and the barklike pic with the branch mark, has three marks and this pic is taken looking up into the overhang. There is also another pic where you can see a tree trunk in the eroded area between two sections of coal. This area there are three small coal seams which I think you can see in the pcitures.

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Nice!!!! Great pics too! Thanks for sharing! :)

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Interesting geology. Nice Mariopteris!

I'm afraid that by the time that stump comes loose it will be too weathered to bother with. Shame..

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