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redleaf101

Joggins, Nova Scotia (2013)

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redleaf101

Taken from blog post http://redleafz.blogspot.ca/2013/07/joggins-nova-scotia-june-2013.html

Being on vacation meant being on the road, looking for rocks. That also meant that during that week, I had to make at least one stop at Joggins, in the wet province of Nova Scotia, where the bees shoot flames, and.. ok, lets move on. Here's a few photos of my trek down the beach.

Like always, be mindful of the tides. Not knowing when high tide comes in could spell trouble as exit routes are not easily found. So you'd end up stranded for a few hours, so really not recommended to stick around when high time comes around.

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Sand nodule containing plants

The sand nodules that I found on the beach are extremely hard and those I came across contained mostly plants, like the one I found already cracked on the photo above. Some of them were covered with pyrite (fool's gold).

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Trackways or sediment deformation?

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Lots of new plants, especially calamites (some whole)

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A lonely fern

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Found the other print of the lonely fern

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Got to the coal mine shaft and was surprised of how much had eroded away in a matter of weeks. Parts of the top of the shaft had collapsed then washed away, leaving a bigger gap. You could smell sulfur, and it smelled like heck!

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Mine shaft pic taken last year (left) and this Summer (right)

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View of inside the shaft

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Stigmaria ('tree' root)

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Calamites in situ

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Sigillaria imprint

I was surprised that this time around there were not many trees. I've found one partly buried in scree, and another (mostly flame scarred) loose on the beach. There was a lot of material that had come loose, but the tide had managed to carry and spread these all over.

This spot is usually hard to resist when talking rock trip. Every time I come down here, I end up seeing an ever changing scenery. If you're ever in the area of Joggins, Nova Scotia, stop by. Its worth it.

Cheers!

- Keenan

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JimB88

Those are some neat plants! Didnt find any hollow logs with early reptiles in them? :D But seriously, Joggins is famous for those.

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Ludwigia

Thanks for this report! I'd love to visit Joggins someday. The last time I was in N.S. was almost half a century ago.

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Plantguy

I was surprised that this time around there were not many trees. I've found one partly buried in scree, and another (mostly flame scarred) loose on the beach. There was a lot of material that had come loose, but the tide had managed to carry and spread these all over.

This spot is usually hard to resist when talking rock trip. Every time I come down here, I end up seeing an ever changing scenery. If you're ever in the area of Joggins, Nova Scotia, stop by. Its worth it.

Cheers!

- Keenan

Hi Keenan, looks like a terrific place for plant material! Question for you...what do you mean by "mostly flame scarred"? Are you describing some type of physical damage to a trunk/tree or possibly some remaining carbon traces/coalification of the plant material?

Thanks for the post. I enjoyed seeing the material in place and the coal mine shots! Regards, Chris

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redleaf101

Soot from forest fires that left their mark before the tree fossilized. These trees have been known to harbour bones of animals that either seeked refuge, or nested. =)

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redleaf101

Also these trees seem to have a higher percentage of containing bones of early amniotes (reptiles) or other animals that died due to exposure when trying to seek refuge, displayed nesting behavior, or became lunch for other trapped animals. I'm sure there's more scenarios that could have played out, but these are some that come to mind. =P

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Plantguy

Also these trees seem to have a higher percentage of containing bones of early amniotes (reptiles) or other animals that died due to exposure when trying to seek refuge, displayed nesting behavior, or became lunch for other trapped animals. I'm sure there's more scenarios that could have played out, but these are some that come to mind. =P

Thanks Keenan, you got me wanting to know more....And I snooped on the web a bit, I probably missed an earlier thread describing this cool site and find out there is lots and lots and lots more that I was unaware of... A world heritage site, over 14000 feet of sediment, 195 Carboniferous species including plants and counting! Oh my, where to start?! What a place to look at fossils!

http://jogginsfossilcliffs.net/

http://museum.gov.ns.ca/fossils/sites/joggins/joggins2.htm

Regards, Chris

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redleaf101

I agree, an incredilble place to look for fossils, and a very cool snapshot of the time in the Carboniferous setting. Some of the world's first were made at these cliffs and since the 1850s, the greats of geology and many others, such as Lyell, were impressed by the site (there is so many more).

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redleaf101

If anybody has the chance to get their hands on this little book, do it. Its very well done! Very good read =)

Coal Age Galapagos - http://novascotia.ca/natr/library/coal-age-book.asp

Mentioned in a previous thread here - http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/32545-john-calder-coal-age-galapagos/

they also carry it at the Fundy Geological Museum shop - http://museum.gov.ns.ca/fgm/en/home/visitus/museumshop.aspx

Cheers!

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