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Found In Southern Indiana


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#1 B!llG

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 09:18 PM

Hi everyone, I'm trying to help my brother ID a fossil that he found in a dry creek bed in southern Indiana.
Here are a few pictures, if you have any questions, please ask.
Thanks!!!

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#2 squalicorax

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 11:23 PM

Possibly Trocholites coiled nautiloid if Ordovician.
http://strata.uga.ed...rocholites.html

My Flickr Page of My Collection: http://www.flickr.co...424101@N00/sets


#3 B!llG

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 07:56 AM

Thanks Squalicorax,
I'm not sure what that means, I'm new to this. But it gives me somewhere to start looking,
If there's any more info anyone may have about this I would appreciate it.
Again thanks!!!

#4 ghost1066

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 08:14 AM

I can't add to that but maybe help explain it. The first name, Trocholites coiled nautiloid, is what the critter is or may be, Google that for lots of info. But that depends on the age of the rock formation it came from. If it is Ordovician (again Google for explanation) then you might know what it is. If the formation is a different age then the species could be something else.

 

Hope that helps.



#5 Indy

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 08:33 AM

Thanks Squalicorax,
I'm not sure what that means, I'm new to this. But it gives me somewhere to start looking,
If there's any more info anyone may have about this I would appreciate it.
Again thanks!!!

Trocholites is a scientific name for 1 specific type of coiled cephalopod

in the Ordovician time period.

 

Fossil Coiled cephalopod Link

:)


Locality & Geology as well as Time Period is important Information

Flash from the Past (Show Us Your Fossils)


#6 B!llG

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 08:40 AM

Thanks guys!
How would I find out how old this is?

#7 ghost1066

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 08:45 AM

According to my source the Paleozoic was from 485.4 million years ago to 443.4 million years ago. The exact age of you fossil would be dependent on the exact formation it came from.



#8 Indy

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 09:02 AM

Thanks guys!
How would I find out how old this is?

This is a common question.

The answers lies in geology.

By that I mean the age of a fossil is determined by specifically where it was collected.

Specific collecting locality will reveal the geological time period.

 

If the locality is Ordovician in age ...

then the fossils found there are Ordovician in age.

 

In this case ... we don't know the exact location where the fossil

was collected so we can only "guess" as to what exactly you found.

 

Many fossil names are only known from within certain time periods

 

We probably can figure out the time period (age of your fossil)

if we know the specific collecting locality ... Southern Indiana is too vague.

The more specific locality information we have ... the more accurately we

can tell you the age of your fossil.


Locality & Geology as well as Time Period is important Information

Flash from the Past (Show Us Your Fossils)


#9 B!llG

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 09:18 AM

Okay thanks, I will call my brother later tonight to find out better info where he found it, and post that info here. Just Curious, if it was a a Trocholites coiled nautiloid from that time period, what if any monetary value would it have?
Again, thanks!!

#10 Indy

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 09:32 AM

Okay thanks, I will call my brother later tonight to find out better info where he found it, and post that info here. Just Curious, if it was a a Trocholites coiled nautiloid from that time period, what if any monetary value would it have?
Again, thanks!!

The Fossil Forum is a fossil discussion group
and the policy is not to discuss/debate the monetary value of fossil.

Hint: Most found fossils have less monetary value than most new members would think.
:P


Locality & Geology as well as Time Period is important Information

Flash from the Past (Show Us Your Fossils)


#11 B!llG

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 09:41 AM

Ah, I guess I should have read that in the policy, thanks for the heads up, I had seen the same question on other post so I thought it was okay, I don't think it's valued less then what I'm thinking cause I really didn't have any amount in mind, it's not even mine. I was just curious, but Thank you for the info!!!

#12 Indy

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 09:47 AM

Ah, I guess I should have read that in the policy, thanks for the heads up, I had seen the same question on other post so I thought it was okay, I don't think it's valued less then what I'm thinking cause I really didn't have any amount in mind, it's not even mine. I was just curious, but Thank you for the info!!!

Click Here

:D


Edited by Indy, 29 July 2013 - 10:02 AM.

Locality & Geology as well as Time Period is important Information

Flash from the Past (Show Us Your Fossils)


#13 Auspex

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 10:28 AM

The proscription is mostly against 'appraisals', as we are in no position to formally offer such (especially when based on photos on a monitor). The general reluctance to suggest even a rough monetary value springs from the same deficiency in examination, as well as the inescapable fact that "value" is such a subjective thing when applied to the products of Mother Nature. Searching on-line dealer sites and auction sites for comparables can give you a basic idea, but we just shy away from the commercialism.


"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about."
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#14 B!llG

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 10:36 AM

Thanks Indy! I checked it out, not bad but all of the one on that link were so small, tiny really compair to the one I have.
Thanks for sticking with me and explaining everything to me!!!!

#15 B!llG

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 04:14 PM

I found the map of the different times so hopefully my brother will be home soon so I can see how old this is.
Where would be a good place to have it checked out?
Thanks!!

#16 Herb

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 04:41 PM

Depending on where it was found , if Ordovician it could be Charactoceras sp, if Devonian it could be Goldringia sp. East of Jeffersonville,IN it is probably Ordovician. West of Jeffersonville about 15 miles it is probably Devonian, and further west than that to Sulfur,IN possibly Mississippian. To the Illinois. border,probably Pennsylvanian.

Either way, that is a great specimen from this area :wub:


Edited by Herb, 29 July 2013 - 04:50 PM.

"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"_ Carl Sagen

No trees were killed in this posting......however, many innocent electrons were diverted from where they originally intended to go.

" I think, therefore I collect fossils." _ Me

"When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."__S. Holmes


#17 B!llG

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 05:50 PM

Thanks Herb!! It is really neat!!! I sent some pictures to a lady at the Indiana State Museum and she said it was a great example but she wasn't real sure what type of fossil it was without seeing in person, which I'm going to try and set up something with her.

#18 B!llG

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 06:01 PM

Hi, I have more info, hopefully this will help ID this.
It was found in the Mississippian time era.
Thanks!!!

#19 Herb

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 07:35 PM

Hi, I have more info, hopefully this will help ID this.
It was found in the Mississippian time era.
Thanks!!!

In that case my best (and only) guess would be Metacoceras sp?


"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"_ Carl Sagen

No trees were killed in this posting......however, many innocent electrons were diverted from where they originally intended to go.

" I think, therefore I collect fossils." _ Me

"When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."__S. Holmes


#20 B!llG

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 10:13 PM

Thanks Herb!!
I googled Metacoceras, and sure enough I saw some that looked really close to what I have!!
I am starting to learn quite a bit about Fosslis! The history behind these fossil are awesome!!
Again thank you guys for all the help!



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