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Arkansas Mammal Fossils

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ashcraft

I came across a J-STOR on some Pantolestes fossils (eocene) collected on Crowley's Ridge in Arkansas, St. Francis county, near Forrest City, out of Crow Creek from the Jackson Group.

Does anybody know anything about this site? Mr. Quinn?

Brent Ashcraft

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mosasaur
I came across a J-STOR on some Pantolestes fossils (eocene) collected on Crowley's Ridge in Arkansas, St. Francis county, near Forrest City, out of Crow Creek from the Jackson Group.

Does anybody know anything about this site? Mr. Quinn?

Brent Ashcraft

I was not aware that there were vertebrate fossils (except shark teeth) from that area. AsI remember, those sediments are marine, though I remember petrified wood also coming from there (perhaps from Pleistocene deposits).

What is Pantolestes - any type of marine mammal?

There is a state park on Crowley's Ridge - you may want to get in touch with the people there, or contact the Arkansas Geological Commission.

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ashcraft

I only have read the abstract of the article. I believe that the Jackson group is marine, and I gather not common in Arkansas. However, this site was found with freshwater turtle remains so is thought to be estuary like. The authors went to the site to specifically look for land mammal remains, and they sieved out portions of the pantolestes (which is a genus). The animal, I believe, is a large herbivorous mammal. I live on Crowley's Ridge- in southern Missouri, so any fossils coming off of it interest me.

Brent Ashcraft

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GRAVELGAZER

I HAVE COLLECTED IN CROW CREEK BEFORE AND HAVE FOUND SHARK TEETH, LOBSTER,AND OTHER TYPES SHELL FOSSILS, I KNOW OF MASTODON AND MAMMOTH TEETH FOUND HERE. OTHER ICE AGE FOSSILS HAVE BEEN FOUND HERE AS WELL. THERE IS ALSO ALOT OF PETRIFIED WOOD.THIS IS A PLACE THAT YOU HAVE TO HUNT IN THE WINTER. THE SNAKES ARE REALLY BAD IN THIS CREEK

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MOROPUS
I was not aware that there were vertebrate fossils (except shark teeth) from that area. AsI remember, those sediments are marine, though I remember petrified wood also coming from there (perhaps from Pleistocene deposits).

What is Pantolestes - any type of marine mammal?

There is a state park on Crowley's Ridge - you may want to get in touch with the people there, or contact the Arkansas Geological Commission.

It`s a tipe of very old insectivore mammal.But for the ID, it has to be a tough work, because although they were quite common, they are quite difficult to ID.Here is a web site, were you can look at some members of the Family.http://www.paleocene-mammals.de/insectivores.htm

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siteseer

I came across a J-STOR on some Pantolestes fossils (eocene) collected on Crowley's Ridge in Arkansas, St. Francis county, near Forrest City, out of Crow Creek from the Jackson Group.

Does anybody know anything about this site? Mr. Quinn?

Brent Ashcraft

I'm late on this but I know a few of the members contributing to this thread are still active. There is an article on this locality:

Westgate, J.W. 1984.

Lower Vertebrates from the Late Eocene Crow Creek Local Fauna, St. Francis County, Arkansas. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Vol.4 (4): 536-546.

I had a friend, the late Ivo Poglayen, who some of you might have known. He was an avid fossil collector and overall good guy, born in Austria and resident of Tucson, AZ. from at least the 80's until his death a few years ago. He told me about collecting in the area and showed me a number of shark teeth he found. I have wondered if people were still hunting that material and just came across this thread today.

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ashcraft

I'm late on this but I know a few of the members contributing to this thread are still active. There is an article on this locality:

Westgate, J.W. 1984.

Lower Vertebrates from the Late Eocene Crow Creek Local Fauna, St. Francis County, Arkansas. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Vol.4 (4): 536-546.

I had a friend, the late Ivo Poglayen, who some of you might have known. He was an avid fossil collector and overall good guy, born in Austria and resident of Tucson, AZ. from at least the 80's until his death a few years ago. He told me about collecting in the area and showed me a number of shark teeth he found. I have wondered if people were still hunting that material and just came across this thread today.

I am interested in this topic, the deposit is a couple of hours south of me, but we have an eocene deposit here that has fossil leaves in it, leading me to think that there may be other material.

Brent Ashcraft

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siteseer

Yeah, where you get leaves, you can get insects and the occasional salamander or bird.

I'd be interested in seeing some of those Crow Creek fossils. The JVP article mentions Crowley's Ridge.

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ashcraft

Yeah, where you get leaves, you can get insects and the occasional salamander or bird.

I'd be interested in seeing some of those Crow Creek fossils. The JVP article mentions Crowley's Ridge.

Crowley's Ridge is an erosional remnant left from the Mississippi and Ohio rivers moving eastward. It stretches from Illinois, through Missouri, and into Arkansas. I actually live on it. In my area, most of the rock is paleozoic (Ordovician), but there is quite a bit of Cretaceous and newer material exposed, especially as you get further south.

Brent Ashcraft

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chapman

i live right next to crow creek and would like to look for fossils. Can anyone post some picks of some found there so i might know what i am looking for?

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ashcraft

i live right next to crow creek and would like to look for fossils. Can anyone post some picks of some found there so i might know what i am looking for?

Try googling the Memphis geological society, or something similar. They take field trips there on a regular basis, may have some photos posted.

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rhinoman

I'm late on this but I know a few of the members contributing to this thread are still active. There is an article on this locality:

Westgate, J.W. 1984.

Lower Vertebrates from the Late Eocene Crow Creek Local Fauna, St. Francis County, Arkansas. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Vol.4 (4): 536-546.

I had a friend, the late Ivo Poglayen, who some of you might have known. He was an avid fossil collector and overall good guy, born in Austria and resident of Tucson, AZ. from at least the 80's until his death a few years ago. He told me about collecting in the area and showed me a number of shark teeth he found. I have wondered if people were still hunting that material and just came across this thread today.

We knew Ivo Poglayen when he was the Curator of the Randolph Park Zoo in Tucson 1979-81. I was a docent at that time. He had a pair of polar bear cubs he was shipping off to St Louis. There is a story here. Anyway, do you know when he died and where?

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westgatejw

The Crow Creek outcrops belong to the late Eocene Jackson Group. The presence of extensive reefs of Crassostrea oysters indicates it was a low salinity estuary on the Arkansas coast of the Jackson Sea. Shark teeth are common and species are dominated by sharks which today prefer water depths of 10 m or less. Whale remains are rare. Two continental mammals were recovered. One was a jaw from an aquatic pantolestid. The other was the 3rd upper molar from the oreodont artiodactyl Diplobunops.

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ashcraft

Thanks for the info. Do you know of any sources that show the regression of the Mississippi Embayment to its present location? There seems to be little info published on the topic.

Brent Ashcraft

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tnjohns

The Crow Creek outcrops belong to the late Eocene Jackson Group. The presence of extensive reefs of Crassostrea oysters indicates it was a low salinity estuary on the Arkansas coast of the Jackson Sea. Shark teeth are common and species are dominated by sharks which today prefer water depths of 10 m or less. Whale remains are rare. Two continental mammals were recovered. One was a jaw from an aquatic pantolestid. The other was the 3rd upper molar from the oreodont artiodactyl Diplobunops.

Just North of the old Hwy 70 bridge in the 60s I discovered in the bed of Crow Creek a jawbone of the Yoke toothed whale (Basilisoras). Over the years I read the Jackson sea period had covered this area maybe eight times. This jawbone was discovered near the bridge below a bluff in an exposed in a grey marl. The discovery occured in the winter and was under water. It was very cold getting it out. The whole jawbone is perhaps two feet long with four large yoked teeth. I;m not sure if a whale has ever been found this far north in Arkansas. At the time, I lived in Memphis and often hunted Crow Creek for shark's teeth and petrified wood.

John

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preston b

Whale jaw? Could you post a pic? And since you folks are fellow arkansans i was wondering what you could tell me about the moorfield shelf its a shale formation i live in batesville very. Close to this geologic formation and I've done some hunting thete ans haven't had much luck but in the same location there is sandstone from the carboniferous period i think... and I've found horn coral and cephalapod remains.. but i would think the shale would be much richer.

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