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Alabama, United States of America, geologic maps link: http://www.gsa.state.al.us/

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Does anyone to happen to know where I can find one of Pennsylvania, I saw one a while ago and forgot to bookmark it, now I cant seem to find it again

thanks

Kelly :)

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Does anyone to happen to know where I can find one of Pennsylvania, I saw one a while ago and forgot to bookmark it, now I cant seem to find it again

thanks

Kelly :)

Hi Kelly, I did a google search for "Geologic bedrock maps for Pennsylvania" and came up with this:

http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/topogeo/publications/pgspub/map/index.htm

I think it might be a good jumping off point for you. If you can get them by county, that would be great!

Good luck in your hunting!

Bev :)

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thank you so much, I see what ya mean, im gonna go and try to get a print shop to print me out a full size map so I got something in the back of our fossil hunting truck as it really could come in handy. they have some really good detailed maps.

God Bless

Kelly

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Kelly, just call your local planning and zoning office and ask them for their geologic bedrock maps. Sometimes they will give you them (and a whole packet that includes abandoned quarries) for FREE! :)

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Hi Bev,

thanks for all your hard work, energy and enthusiasm as always. Wanted to let folks know this link didn't work for Wisconsin.

http://wgnhs.uwex.edu/gis.htm

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Thanks Penny, if you find a good link for WI, please put it up. :)

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I have a few custom maps I did for north Texas. I digitized the old state geo map and overlayed it onto new street maps.

http://www.northtexasfossils.com/maps.htm

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There's also a geologic map phone application out there called "Mancos".

I believe some geologic data is also being added to GIS data-sets and maps but I don't know how to use those and the GIS program is out of my budget.

Edited by LanceH

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GREAT JOB LANCEH!!! :goodjob: Now if only I could figure out how to do that for SE Minnesota! :)

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I believe some geologic data is also being added to GIS data-sets and maps but I don't know how to use those and the GIS program is out of my budget.

I know I've posted this link in other threads, but it belongs here too:

http://mrdata.usgs.gov/geology/state/ (or just google "geologic map google earth")

Here you can get free geologic map files for every U.S. state, formatted for Google Earth, which is also free. So basically you're getting GIS-level mapping layers for free. These are excellent and very high resolution.

Download the .kml or .kmz file for your state (.kmz is just a zipped .kml, so it doesn't really matter which you pick, but .kmz will download faster). Click to open the file, and it will automatically open in Google Earth (if you already have Google Earth installed). Save before closing Google Earth, and it will stay in your "my places" bar always for easy access.

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I wanted to say that this is a great thread. Please keep in mind that bedrock maps are not 100% accurate. I have found some great fossils in "non-fossiliferous" geologic units and I have found geologic units that weren't identified on the State map. This is especially true in states like Vermont and New Hampshire with all of the regional metamorphism. This isn't a negative comment about my State Geologist as much as it is about the complexity of the structural geology of the New England region. Some states have very accurate geologic maps. I am more interested in rock type and age when looking for new collecting sites.

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I wanted to say that this is a great thread. Please keep in mind that bedrock maps are not 100% accurate. I have found some great fossils in "non-fossiliferous" geologic units and I have found geologic units that weren't identified on the State map. This is especially true in states like Vermont and New Hampshire with all of the regional metamorphism. This isn't a negative comment about my State Geologist as much as it is about the complexity of the structural geology of the New England region. Some states have very accurate geologic maps. I am more interested in rock type and age when looking for new collecting sites.

VERY GOOD POINT Cluros! I too have found fossils in bedrock that is not noted as being fossiliferous. But I have found many more fossils in the bedrock that is marked fossiliferous. :-D Also, there are wonderful minerals to be found in other bedrock formations. I'm just beginning to learn about minerals, so can't speak to it, but a whole other fascinating subject. :-D

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There is an iPhone app called Mancos that covers most of the U.S. I find it very useful when traveling.

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A site I've used and found very useful is:

http://www.indianamap.org/

It's an interactive map of Indiana with a lot of neat/informative layers that can be customized. My favorite definitely is the "Silurian Reef Points" layer ;)

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There's an app called Flyover Country which both acts as a geologic map but also uses info from the Paleobiology Database to show what fossils are found in what locaion. You have to plot out from where to where you are going, and save it, so that you can see the geologic maps offline as well. It works best when you are either driving or on a plane.

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For uk, it's below in my signature :)

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WOW!!! Thanks EVERYBODY for contributing to the KNOWLEDGE!!! :-D

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Hi everyone!

I'm new to this fossil-hunting business, but I'm quickly becoming addicted to it :-)

I've found a couple of links that might be useful for anyone who is fossil-hunting in southern Ontario:

1. The link below is for a 1972 document entitled "Paleozoic Geology of Southern Ontario" by D. F. Hewitt. There is a coloured map on the very last page of the document ("page 19" of the document itself) that shows all of the geologic formations for southern Ontario.

http://www.geologyontario.mndmf.gov.on.ca/mndmfiles/pub/data/imaging/R105/R105.pdf

2. The link below is for a 2007 document that also happens to be entitled "Paleozoic Geology of Southern Ontario," but this one is by Derek K. Armstrong and J.E.P. Dodge. There is a coloured map on "page 24" and on "page 25" there is a diagram/table showing the Paleozoic stratigraphy of southern Ontario.

http://maps-beta.niagararegion.ca/Metadata/md/DocumentUpload/2007-08-08%2014-44-38.pdf

Happy hunting, everyone!

Monica

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Good evening everyone,

There is a website / company that I use called Historic Aerials. As the name states, you can view historic and current aerial pics from areas all over the U.S. There are pics from (1989 and before) and (1990 and after). There is no charge to view the area that you are interested in and the views are "watermarked" with the company name, but you can still see the areas with no problem. You can also purchase the digital file of older views for $20.00 and newer views for $5.00, without the "watermark"- i believe the Tif file is 9+ mb.

This is great information for areas where Mazon Creek fossils are found. There are aerial views from 1939 of the famed Pit 11 before there was Pit 11. The next available views are from 1952, 1961, 1971, 1974, etc. when the strip mining was in full force. The next view is 1988 and the Braidwood Nuclear Power Plant shows up in the pic. There is also a comparison feature, that allows you to have a map from (i.e. 1971) and then select a map from (i.e. 2012) and using your mouse, you can slide the view over one another and see how the area has changed. Besides giving you historic visual information on a particular area, you can also use it to find areas that are (i.e. under construction) and are being re-exposed after that area was reclaimed by nature and fossils may once again be available. Or you can just use it to see your neighborhood before your was there.

Hope this information is useful to someone.

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Good evening everyone,

There is a website / company that I use called Historic Aerials...

Good one!

Here is a link: LINK

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Good one!

Here is a link: LINK

Thanks for taking care of the link, I was not sure how to do it. I really do like that site for Historical imagery.

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