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digit

Cool site. I put in my address and got to go back and see my development before my house was built. I went back further when it was just open land with no roads and further still when my property was just part of the Everglades (not that long ago). I could see this site being really useful for doing historical searches of the extents of fossil bearing areas to see where other outcrops might still be found in the future. Technology of the future helping us to search for remains of the past.

Cheers.

-Ken

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sdsnl

Auspex mentioned the potentional for broken links. If you can tell us how you found the geologic formation maps for your area, that may even be more helpful! I did a search for "geologic formation maps Minnesota". After clicking all over the place I finally found how to get them by county.Also, I would be willing to help any TFF member who comes to southeastern Minnesota as much as I can to have a successful hunt.Bev :)

Judt found this thread, very useful! To avoid broken link issues, you can use the wayback machine: http://archive.org/web/

At the top, you can enter a brokn link to see if an earlier version of that link is available. If yoy scroll to the bottom, you can enter useful links to archive them, in case they get broken in the future.

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Nimravis

Cool site. I put in my address and got to go back and see my development before my house was built. I went back further when it was just open land with no roads and further still when my property was just part of the Everglades (not that long ago). I could see this site being really useful for doing historical searches of the extents of fossil bearing areas to see where other outcrops might still be found in the future. Technology of the future helping us to search for remains of the past.

Cheers.

-Ken

Ken- Glad you like the site and that is exactly what I use it for, I know where new construction is going up in a specific area and I check past Aerials to see if it was a strip mine area and then check for concretions.

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sdsnl
1 hour ago, fossiling said:

Here's the link to the geological survey of Hong Kong

But we can't fossil hunt in Hong Kong, can we?

 

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sdsnl

Maps for Japan: https://gbank.gsj.jp/seamless/download/downloadIndex_e.html

 

1. When you open the link, you see a map of Japan with many numbered rectangles on it. You need to figure out which rectangle your fossil site belongs to and click on it.

 

2. It may not be obvious, but a table would now appear on the top center. You can choose to download the basic or detailed map.

 

3. To the right of the table, you will see "legend". Download the basic or detailed legend according to the kind of map you chose. The legend will tell you which color on the map means which age.

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fossiling
On Tuesday, September 20, 2016 at 9:50 PM, sdsnl said:

But we can't fossil hunt in Hong Kong, can we?

 

Here's the link to the geological survey of Hong Kong :www.ngensis.com

and yes,we can't.

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Bev

Thank you Fossiling for sharing this information!  :D  :yay-smiley-1:

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Hat

New Mexico interactive geologic map.

 

http://geoinfo.nmt.edu/maps/

 

Works well. On the toolbar on the right click "Geologic resources" then "state geologic map" then check the box marked "geologic units". Sometimes it takes several seconds to see the geologic overlay after you check the box.

Edited by Hat

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Bev
46 minutes ago, Hat said:

New Mexico interactive geologic map.

 

http://geoinfo.nmt.edu/maps/

 

Works well. On the toolbar on the right click "Geologic resources" then "state geologic map" then check the box marked "geologic units". Sometimes it takes several seconds to see the geologic overlay after you check the box.

Thanks Hat!!!  :-D

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PFOOLEY
1 hour ago, Hat said:

New Mexico interactive geologic map.

 

http://geoinfo.nmt.edu/maps/

 

Works well. On the toolbar on the right click "Geologic resources" then "state geologic map" then check the box marked "geologic units". Sometimes it takes several seconds to see the geologic overlay after you check the box.

 

Gracias. 

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lcordova

Lance,

Thanks for the link, I visit frequently your website and I cant recall seeing those.... for a lonewolf from houston who goes 2-3 times a year to dig to the DFW area is great help.

 

Auspex,

That website is so cool. Thanks

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CoyoteJoe

https://geology.utah.gov/map-pub/maps/geologic-maps/ 

 

This is for Utah. The only parts I've played with are the 7.5 Quadrangles and the interactive map. You can save most of the 7.5 ones as PDFs (meaning not every 7.5 for the state of Utah is available) and some of those also come with the text booklet. The interactive map you can click an area and it will tell you which quadrangle it belongs to and sometimes gives options to open it as a TIFF or PDF or purchase it (I guess as a physical copy?) Oh, and some (maybe the TIFF?) open as old scans, which I thought was neat.

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Bev

Thanks CoyoteJoe for sharing!

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EMP

Here's a link to the Maryland Geological Survey's "Index to Online Geologic Maps" of the state of Maryland as well as Washington DC. The maps are older (1968), and note a few inaccuracies:

 

- The Wissahickon Formation is no longer used. It has since been divided in Maryland into the Glenram Group; the Oella Schist, Loch Raven Formation, Setters Quartzite and Cockeysville Marble.

 

- The "Chemung Formation" has been renamed the Foreknobs Formation. The term Chemung is defunct in Maryland.

 

- The "Romney Formation" is defunct in Maryland, replaced with Marcellus Shale.

 

- "Parkhead Sandstone" is now mapped as the Scherr Formation.

 

- The "Woodmont Formation" is a defunct term. It has since been remapped and is mostly in the Scherr Formation.

 

-The Conococheague Limestone is in part basal Ordovician based on trilobite and conodont faunas.

 

- The Cash Smith Shale (not listed in this map, but referenced in other works) was remapped on a later date in 1980s and found to be a member of the Araby Formation, not a separate unit itself.

 

- The ages of most formations in the Piedmont are not known for certain, but current interpretation holds them as Cambrian and not Precambrian in age.

 

- The Dunkard Group is in part uppermost Pennsylvanian based on plant fossils.

 

http://www.mgs.md.gov/esic/geo/

 

 

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Bev

Thank you so much for sharing EMP!!!  :-D

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