obsessed1

2 Dino Teeth For Id

21 posts in this topic

I found these two last weekend in North Carolina. Found in Upper cretaceous, Black Creek Formation.

One is from a carnivore and the other from a herbivore. I haven't been able to get home from work for better photos taken outside, sorry. I also have all my scales and such packed away at the moment. The herbivore tooth is 3/4" including the root. The carivore tooth is just over 1/2". I have an idea one the herivore but will wait to see what more knowlegeable folks have to say.

The carnivore: post-281-0-90740200-1380493712_thumb.jpg post-281-0-55062700-1380493725_thumb.jpg

The herbivore:post-281-0-90050300-1380493746_thumb.jpg

If you need photos from other angles let me know. Thanks for looking!

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WOW! Way to go Kevin!

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Which part of the Upper Cretaceous exactly? The hadrosaur tooth is very primitive.

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These are special finds. More than special.

What is the specific age of this Formation? The herbivore might be a gryposaur-like hadrosaurid but not able to identify a Hadrosaur genus from a single tooth. 'If' I found it in our deposits I might label it a Corythosaurus but that would be a general label knowing what a particular formation yields.

Just a note...don't assume it is whatever Hadrosaur that has been identified from that formation . Could be unique.

The theropod tooth. Not sure. Do the denticles appear worn or are they pristine? maybe some type of velociraptorine dromaeosaurid like Saurornitholestes.

Value of this posting....two cents.

Edited by Northstar

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nice job kevin!

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Thanks for the kind comments.

There doesn't seem to be alot of information on this site but from what I have been able to find out the fauna is of lower Campanian age and is closely allied to the Belly River Fauna of the Western Interior.

I also found another of the herbivore teeth but it is missing the root and a little of the crown. It does exhibt the same type of irregularity along the edges. There was also a small section of the more "normal" (at least what I have seen photos of) type of Hadrosaur tooth with smooth ridges along the edges.

Edited by obsessed1

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That helps. Those rough edges can be misleading. I understand why Opisthotriton above mentioned a primitive hadrosaur...that was also my first thought except for the size.

I doubt if any ID is possible but if pressed to make a decision on a quiz show with time running out I'd go with some gryposaur hadrosaur. A lot of hadrosaur stuff on the east coast gets thrown in with Hadrosaurus foulkii (spelling?) but that species is a bit of a mishmash.

Again. Super find. Wow.

Edited by Northstar

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Great finds! Congrats man!

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Wow. Unreal. Definitely on my most wanted list.

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Appalachiosaurus and Hypsobema (=H. foulki)? Guesses based on what's reported from the Tarheel formation. Have also seen the littler carnosaur teeth called dromeosaur. I think that teeth are not very diagnostic though

Edited by Plax

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Rick, Mike and Plax thanks for your comments! If I could only find a complete skull ID would be easier. B)

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everyone's fantasy!

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awesome finds! congrats!!!

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I sent some photos to Vince Schneider from the North Carolina Museum. He has Identified the theropod tooth as a Dryptosaurus. :D

He has requested more photos to give me a better ID of the other tooth. I will update as soon as I get more information.

Edited by obsessed1

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WOW! Great finds.

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. Dryptosaurus? I question that. It's dromaeosaurid tooth and not a Tyrannosaurid.

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Excellent finds, Kevin. There is a unique satisfaction when you accomplish finding something rare.

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Wow! Awesome find Kevin, Congratulations!

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posting a picture of the bottom of the tooth (showing its shape in cross-section) would be useful.

IMHO, there is far too little diagnostic dinosaur material from the late cretaceous of the east coast to identify either of these teeth with specific genera.

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Missed this one but if its worth anything I will throw my weight 110% behind Northstar's interpretation of the teeth.

Very cool finds no matter what.

The big question I need answered is when are you going back out there again?

I hope it is really soon, if I found material like that I would be itching to get back there and dig some more.

thanks for sharing

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For comparison... however I know some experts have been referring teeth this these from the Campanian of NC as simply dromeosaurid.

post-382-0-36499000-1380820469_thumb.jpg

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