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GerryK

More "trilobites Of New York"

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GerryK

Since the publication of "Trilobites of New York" more interesting specimens have been found and prepped. This new topic will complement "Trilobites of New York" by posting trilobites that were not illustrated, new discoveries or specimens of better quality. So as I find these trilobites, I will post them.

I'm starting off with a poorly understood trilobite, Ceraurus pleurexanthemus. The problem in understanding this trilobite is that Green's type specimen is buried in shale and what is exposed is not very diagnostic. This has resulted in many different types of Ceraurus being assigned to this species. After the publication of the book I was very fortunate to have the privilege to prepare the holotype and paratype of Ceraurus pleurexanthemus. I'm posting pictures of what they originally looked like and what they look like after preparation. Also posted is a Ceraurus from the Walcott Rust Quarry. Many of these specimens are being commercially collected and made available to collectors and are labeled Ceraurus pleurexanthemus. By comparing the Walcott-Rust Quarry specimen with the holotype, one can see that they are not the same species and the Walcott-Rust Quarry specimens are an undescribed species. Now, anyone that has a Ceraurus in their collection can compare it with the holotype and determine if one has a Ceraurus pleurexanthemus. I have seen Ceraurus from Ontario, Canada that do compare very well with Ceraurus pleurexanthemus. Somebody may have one in their collection.

I'm hoping the picture of the prepped holotype and a revision of the Ceraurus will be published this year.

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piranha

Hi Gerry,

Thanks for posting these great trilobites and congrats on the excellent prep on the type specimens.

Please keep us posted on the upcoming paper.

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Caleb

Looking forward to seem more bugs from NY and especially that Ceraurus paper!

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Fossildude19

Fantastic prep work, Gerry.

Thanks for showing us.

Regards,

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Malcolmt

I am surprised the holotype came out so nice. Excellent prep work as per usual for you. Now I am going to have to look through all my Ontario Ceraurus though most are partials in not great state of preservation from Bowmanville and Brechin

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GerryK

Ceratolichas dracon
Middle Devonian
Onondaga Limestone



I have previously posted this trilobite under the fossil of the month for February 2012. Some may not have seen this trilobite and this topic is a good place to post it again.

I collected this trilobite over 10 years ago and it just sat in a box. One day when I was going through the box looking for specimens of Phacops that I collected and I noticed one of the limestone blocks had a cross section of a spine I thought to be a Kettneraspis. Then I noticed a second spine so it couldn't be a Kettneraspis. I decided to prep it to determine what the trilobite could be. The prepping was difficult due to the micro crystalline quartz in the limestone. This made the matrix very hard to work and would shatter like glass when using a micro scribe. When I finished prepping the trilobite, I was surprised to discovered it has 9 cephalic spines. Because this trilobite was in a limestone,
this resulted in the cephalon being three dimensional and the spines nicely preserved. It's not unusual for lichids to have spines, but I don't know of any lichid that has this many cephalic spines.

Hall and Clarke (1888) illustrated a line drawings of the cephalon of Ceratolichas dracon and reconstructed the spines. One of them is refigured on page 125, figure 5.1A of "Trilobites of New York." This photographed specimen is more complete than what Hall and Clarke (1888) illustrated because it has the 3 spines on the occipital lobe and the other spines are present.

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GerryK
Apianurus sp.
Ordovician
Walcott Rust quarry
Collected by Jason Cooper and Jake Skabelund.
I have been waiting some time to post this trilobite and I finally got permission. For me this Apianurus is the most spectacular Odontopleurid ever found from New York. Apianurus has been described from the Chazy but there is no mention of one occurring from the Trenton of New York. This specimen has been sent off to be described.

Dan Cooper from "Trilobites of America" (the group working the Walcott Rust Quarry) sent me the following description of how it was found.

"Jason, Jake, myself and Matt Phillips were breaking the "large Isotelus" layer and only had 3 stools. Jason pulled down a large rock for Matt to sit on and break rock. He used that rock all weekend and left it. Monday Jake split the same rock and found the Apianurus! Matt was a good "Hen" sitting on his egg."

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Fossildude19

Wow!

Amazing trilobites!

Had no idea spiny ones like these existed in NY!

Regards,

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piranha
Apianurus sp.

Ordovician

Walcott Rust quarry
Collected by Jason Cooper and Jake Skabelund.
I have been waiting some time to post this trilobite and I finally got permission. For me this Apianurus is the most spectacular Odontopleurid ever found from New York. Apianurus has been described from the Chazy but there is no mention of one occurring from the Trenton of New York. This specimen has been sent off to be described.

Dan Cooper from "Trilobites of America" (the group working the Walcott Rust Quarry) sent me the following description of how it was found.

"Jason, Jake, myself and Matt Phillips were breaking the "large Isotelus" layer and only had 3 stools. Jason pulled down a large rock for Matt to sit on and break rock. He used that rock all weekend and left it. Monday Jake split the same rock and found the Apianurus! Matt was a good "Hen" sitting on his egg."

Apianurus sp.-2.jpg Apianurus sp.10.jpg

eyepopping.gifeyepopping.gif eyepopping.gif

Incredible prep on this spectacular trilobite. Congrats!

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GerryK

eyepopping.gifeyepopping.gif eyepopping.gif

Incredible prep on this spectacular trilobite. Congrats!

I did not prep the trilobite and I don't know who to give credit for the preparation.

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GerryK
Amphilichas cornutus
Ordovician
Walcott Rust quarry

This specimen is sooo much better than what is shown in the book.

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Ludwigia

:wub: Looks like it's doing a water ballet!!

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jpc

spectacular trilobites and prep work. Thanks for sharing

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ZiggieCie

Wow, WOw, and WOW!!

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GerryK

Dalmanites limulurus

Silurian

Rochester Shale

Specimens of D. limulurus from the Rochester Shale have been either black or dark brown in color. This specimen I collected and prepped is unusual being stained by weathering pyrite to limonite giving it a rusty color. Some of the surrounding shale is also stained by the limonite. This specimen is illustrated on Plate 88 of "Trilobites of New York" and is now shown what the black and white trilobite looks like in color.

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Malcolmt

Dalmanites has always been one of my favorite New York Trilobites

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Fred

Spectacular specimens, spectacular prep, sir!

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FossilDAWG

How have I missed this thread until just now?? What spectacular specimens. I had no idea anything like that Apianurus occurred in the New York (or Ontario) Ordovician; I've never seen even a fragment of anything like that. The prep on everything is magical, those trilobites look as if they're about to crawl off the rock.

Don

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GerryK
Eldredgeops rana
Middle Devonian
Hamilton Group

Eldredgeops rana is the most common trilobite collected from New York. Most are found from different shale units and are flattened by compaction. This specimen is special for me because it has maintained its three dimensional shape. I collected and prepped it from a limestone where little compaction occurs and has maintained its nice inflated glabella. This is like so many Moroccan trilobites that are collected from limestones. Because there is no distortion from compaction, I can compare it to other Phacopids.

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Edited by GerryK

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Malcolmt

Definitely like the side view, a common fossil but can be quite spectacular looking when truly three dimensional and well prepped. I am assuming that the coating to enhance the photography is ammonium chloride that has been heated to create a smoke.

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GerryK

Definitely like the side view, a common fossil but can be quite spectacular looking when truly three dimensional and well prepped. I am assuming that the coating to enhance the photography is ammonium chloride that has been heated to create a smoke.

Yes, it is coated with ammonium chloride for contrast to enhance its three dimensional features. I will be using it again in another post and the coating will help to compare to other trilobites.

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fossilcrazy

The Murder Creek unit along the northeast shore of Lake Erie is a good place to find limey lens in the shale that contain the inflated "Phacops". I know Gerry, I should be using the "E" word. Typically finding the bugs in the limey nodules, means breaking up the blocks and the bugs are usually divided when you discover them; but the preservation is always good.

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Arthur in NY

Amazing finds and prep!

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