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Are Asteroceras Common In The U.s. Central Texas Region?


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I am new to the site and had a question on asteroceras and how common they are to find in Texas or the U.S. for that matter. Any information would be greatly appreciated, thank you.

I attached a few images of the fist few I've found still have a huge bucket to go through.

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I don't know whether Asteroceras is found outside of Lyme Regis (UK), and the only known Jurassic fossils from Texas are from the Malone Mountains in the far west.

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Piranha has shown the information you need to answer your question. We have a good number of sites in Germany where they occur. I'm still curious to see the images of the ones you say you've found. Didn't the upload work? If that was in Texas, then you must have dug pretty deep ;) .

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Piranha has shown the information you need to answer your question. We have a good number of sites in Germany where they occur. I'm still curious to see the images of the ones you say you've found. Didn't the upload work? If that was in Texas, then you must have dug pretty deep ;) .

Thank you Piranha but I believe I read the article on wiki and found nothing about them in Texas.

Thank you for the info Ludwigia, I found the first at a baseball field in FTworth TX at about 2ft into bedrock along with some other strange bone and shelled creature fragments. I will attempt to repost the pictures of the few small pieces I've uncovered so far.

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These are just the small pieces I've found so far and I have a 10 gallon bucket of huge chunks of rock that show signs of plenty more.

Sorry if the image is too large.

2UTWUMW.jpg

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I don't know whether Asteroceras is found outside of Lyme Regis (UK), and the only known Jurassic fossils from Texas are from the Malone Mountains in the far west.

Thank you Auspex for confirming my findings, that's exactly what I found out as well. It really perplexed me as to what I came across and the amount there was in a 2ft by 3ft hole.

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I don't know ammonites, but I'd wager that you have some cretaceous analog that resembles Asteroceras in some ways.

We have no shortage of members who are very familiar with the fossils in your area, and they should be able to straighten things out.

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Uncle Siphuncle

mortoniceras from the albian, probably duck creek, ft worth or weno formation, most likely one of the first two, easy to ascertain if you care to pm locality details.

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Dan's got it. It is definitely not Asteroceras. You would have had to dig down 2 miles to get to them... ;)

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Welsh Wizard

Hi

I'm not an ammonite expert but I thought I'd add my thoughts.

Asteroceras is from the Lower Lias, Lower Jurassic, Sinemurian. In the UK, they can be found in Lyme Regis, Gloucester, Scunthorpe and Robin Hoods Bay near Whitby plus other locations where the relevant beds can be found. Im sorry but I don't know about their global presence or whether they can be found in the US.

The pictures resemble Asteroceras but there are some differences in both the keel and the ribbing.

I hope this helps and good luck in identifying your finds.

All the best

Nick

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Nice of you to chime in, Nick, but Dan has already identified it in his last post. As far as my last comment is concerned, I was just joking. Actually, Texas was land-bound at the time that Asteroceras was swimming around the oceans of the world, so no amount of digging there today will get you one. As Piranha already mentioned, you have to get up to the northwest of America to have any chance of finding one. That and a few small exposures in the northeastern USA are the only places on the continent that were under water at the time.

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Wow! :drool: I missed that one.

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