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dozer operator

Tamiami Formation Fossil Photos

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dozer operator

Some photos from trips to the southwest coast of Florida last year I haven't shared with TFF. i dont think vert fossils are nearly as common in tamiami as mollusk#1 post-10787-0-31052900-1396745926_thumb.pngm heres a pic of what I think is a fish vert.

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dozer operator

An example of a beautiful preserved siphocypraea (cowrie shell) with near perfect gloss and original color from in the 2.4 to 4 million year old range post-10787-0-12992000-1396746288_thumb.png

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dozer operator
post-10787-0-09094200-1396747082_thumb.png Edited by dozer operator

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dozer operator
post-10787-0-99216500-1396747255_thumb.png

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Plantguy

Hey Dozer, more nice finds! Yep, the Tamiami is a ridiculously fossil rich formation down here--we are lucky to dig into. I also found a few cowries earlier in the week in Sarasota County from the Tamiami. The one larger one I found was pretty worn with a few holes and nowhere near as nice as yours. I cant recall if I found any coral types like your beauty. Many I found were branching types but there a few rounded versions but I believe they were different than yours.

Do you find any of the hermit shell types...they are common on this side of the state...where a gastropod has the complete coral or partial coral covering.

Congrats on the cowrie! Thanks for the photos! Regards, Chris

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dozer operator

I found alot of fossil olive shells with coral covering. It makes me wonder if the coral attached itself after death....or while the creature was still alive and well crawling around the reef. Heres a photopost-10787-0-90862300-1396821753_thumb.png

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Auspex

In this case, I would say postmortem, as the coral is on what in life would have been a downward-facing side, and within the aperture.

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dozer operator

Hmm...the shell must have had to lay upside down on the bottom undisturbed for a quite while in order for coral to grow. I wonder what caused a rapid burial to preserve this one for so long

Edited by dozer operator

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Auspex

Does anyone know how long it might take for this encrustation to accumulate? Maybe less than we'd think in a calm, warm, shallow sea.

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Boesse

I've published on barnacle-encrusted sea lion bones, and have only looked into invertebrates commonly encrusting fossil vertebrates; I don't quite know about coral growth rates (my guess is longer than barnacles). That being said, some careful work was done in the 1980's on how to identify hermitted gastropod shells from the Pleistocene of California based on the distribution of encrusters and boring traces. Hermit crabs will maintain certain parts of the aperture, and if that is clean (in a gastropod that is infaunal) you can infer the encrusters existed when the shell was hermitted. In this case, the prevalence of coral on the aperture side (and absence on the upper side) suggests postmortem attachment, as does the concentration of polyps within the aperture itself, as Auspex stated.

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Plantguy

I found alot of fossil olive shells with coral covering. It makes me wonder if the coral attached itself after death....or while the creature was still alive and well crawling around the reef. Heres a photoattachicon.gifScreenshot_2014-04-06-17-54-48.png

Hey Dozer, neat find! I dont think I've found one of the olive types yet....Here's a sampling of the shapes/forms I'm running into.

post-1240-0-44521600-1396919547_thumb.jpgpost-1240-0-34347700-1396919549_thumb.jpg

I've published on barnacle-encrusted sea lion bones, and have only looked into invertebrates commonly encrusting fossil vertebrates; I don't quite know about coral growth rates (my guess is longer than barnacles). That being said, some careful work was done in the 1980's on how to identify hermitted gastropod shells from the Pleistocene of California based on the distribution of encrusters and boring traces. Hermit crabs will maintain certain parts of the aperture, and if that is clean (in a gastropod that is infaunal) you can infer the encrusters existed when the shell was hermitted. In this case, the prevalence of coral on the aperture side (and absence on the upper side) suggests postmortem attachment, as does the concentration of polyps within the aperture itself, as Auspex stated.

Hey Bobby, thanks.

I started to look at some of finds and do some researching of online literature. MikeR first mentioned these guys in some of this Tamiami formation info and then I found quite a few and I became curious. I have several different types of gastropods...most showing the aperture still clean/visible that I guess the hermit crab was able to sit in while the coral formed. 2nd one from the right on the bottom row shows how the coral took over the aperture completely I guess after the shell was completely abandoned.

I have found a bunch of the individual larger turritella types of shells from the area but I havent had any that I could say for sure were coral encrusted. I found the two attached pubs that talk a bit about the taphonomy and of turritella types but I dont think mention how long it takes a shell to be encrusted. I'll keep looking as there are lots of references on the Tamiami.

Taphonomy and paleoenvironment of two turritellid-gastropod-rich beds, Pliocene of Florida, Allmon, Spizuco, and Jones.

94_Allmon_Spizuco,MP,_Jones,DS_(1995)_Lethaia_28(1)_(75-84).pdf

Regards, Chris

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Plantguy

And the...

Age, Environment and Mode of Deposition of the Densely Fossiliferous Pinecrest Sand (Pliocene of Florida: Implications for the Role of Biological Productivity in Shell Bed formation, Allmon. Palaios, 193. V. 8, p.183-201.

Oh dang, it wont let me upload the pdf...file too large

Well I have a copy if someone is interested. Regards, Chris

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dozer operator

Thanks for the pdf chris im saving it for later review. I wish there were more detailed information on the southeast coast. I can't find much for ever here because the lack of pits/exposure

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Plantguy

Hi Dozer, more info for you. Not sure if you've seen this SEG reference guide by Dr. Roger Portell and others--could have already mentioned it somewhere..it has some explanation of the Tamiami units on this side of Florida and several photos of the general types of fossils within them--mostly invertebrates but a small mention of some vertebrate stuff. http://segs.org/wp/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/SEGS-Guidebook-No-56.pdf

Here's their Figure 4 showing the units/layers and main fossil types.

post-1240-0-09352000-1397271012_thumb.jpg

I also found this reference Geology of the Everglades and adjacent areas by Petuch and Roberts that has some good Tamiami info and fossil pictures. Unfortunately it looks like around $100. Here's a link that you can go to in google books and see some of the pages and photographs. If I find a cheaper or free copy somewhere I'll let you know. http://books.google.com/books?id=_RlF61pBkqQC&pg=PA72&lpg=PA72&dq=tamiami+formation+everglades&source=bl&ots=BuhZ7IrCks&sig=7gDu-vZaXByv57axKZj2u0f8-rw&hl=en&sa=X&ei=cKRIU_GeBevE2QWlu4HYCA&ved=0CDcQ6AEwAzgK#v=onepage&q=tamiami%20formation%20everglades&f=false

Dont forget Mike's great info and blog here in the forum.

http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/blog/101/entry-171-tamiami-formation-bed-11/

http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/blog/101/entry-197-the-lower-pinecrest-beds-tamiami-formation/

I found a few very small bone fragments and a small chunk of turtle but no teeth again this week while collecting after work. I did find these 2 Hystrivasum maybe at least one of them is H. lockilini and another gastropod which I think is a Crucibulum cf. waltonense.

post-1240-0-48215400-1397270092_thumb.jpgLots of other stuff that I'm in the process of cleaning.

I found a bowling ball sized coral that is really muddy really heavy and not sure its worth taking home. I was telling Jeff that it looks like its got "hernia" potential, but I may try lugging it home anyways to see what it looks like after cleaning...thought about it this week but didnt have the time.

post-1240-0-74978600-1397270214_thumb.jpg

Hope you do well this weekend if you go out!

Regards, Chris

Edit to add strata chart....

Edited by Plantguy

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dozer operator

Thanks Chris!

The Segs guidebook #56 and mikes tamimi blog are great. I have the geology of the everglades and adjacent areas book by petuch. I would recommend the book I refer to it before and after just about every shell pit hunt it has a lot of information on the geological formations and the fossil mollusk found within.

Heres a pic of some nice vasum, a limpet or type of Crucibulum and a few golden gate tamiami coral (note the bottom left is 2 coral with one growing off the other :) )post-10787-0-08370300-1397315308_thumb.pngpost-10787-0-44560700-1397315350_thumb.png

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Plantguy

Hey Dozer, nice finds. Those corals look super!

What I'm finding are surface finds that are pretty beaten up at times and nothing like your delicate looking finds. Here's some of the branching types on the right of the photo that I'm finding along with whats left of a monster gastropod. Dont know genus/species on either at the moment. Interesting to see the inner whorls---It was buried in the dirt and I had to look at it a couple times as I thought it looked like some piece of weird spiral porcelain figurine. There is some really big stuff in these finds....including the Hyotissa oysters and Mercenaria clams...the Mercenaria on the right is on the smallish size--adults seem to be at least twice that size.

post-1240-0-59880700-1397341544_thumb.jpg

http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/invertpaleo/display.asp?catalog_number=7844&gallery_type=Florida%20Mollusca-Bivalvia

http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/invertpaleo/display.asp?catalog_number=60411&gallery_type=Florida%20Mollusca-Bivalvia

I think the Crucibulum that you have looks like this one maybe C. spinosa also in the Univ of Florida's Museum of Nat Hists online image gallery photos...Mike or someone else on the forum might know for sure.

http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/invertpaleo/display.asp?catalog_number=84256&gallery_type=Florida%20Mollusca-Gastropoda

Regards, Chris

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Plantguy

Hey Dozer, still trying to find the time to go thru the Tamiami stuff I keep picking up after work.

So I was trying to go thru some of the Oyster like guys and have these. I believe the large guys are Hyotissa haitensis and the smaller "kitten paws" are the Plicatula marginata. Not sure about the intermediate sized ones at this point. Most of these guys have both valves intact.

post-1240-0-31719500-1401146126_thumb.jpgpost-1240-0-15715400-1401146128_thumb.jpg

I believe these corals are Siderastrea dalli, not very common over here..

post-1240-0-28332900-1401146124_thumb.jpg

Lastly, I've only found a few of the Slipper shells. I think I've got a Crepdula aculeata, Bostrycapulus aculeatus and a Crepidula fornicata. Hope Mike or Harry can straighten me out if I've got them wrong.

post-1240-0-96204300-1401146129_thumb.jpgpost-1240-0-97025000-1401146131_thumb.jpg

Havent made it over to the east coast yet...maybe in the next couple of months.

Regards, Chris

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