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JUAN EMMANUEL

'bivalvia Cliff ', Mimico Creek

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JUAN EMMANUEL

I made two trips to a place at Mimico creek where a cliff of bedrock collapsed recently and ended up exposing a good amount of fossils. The first trip was on this Wednesday and the other was on today. I mostly found Ordovician bivalves to spice up collection, because my collection lacked pelycopods. The recent rains here in Toronto were the reasons why the bedrock cliff collapsed. And I have to say, the debris that fell was productive!! :wub: I ended nicknaming the spot 'Bivalvia Cliff '. post-13300-0-96096800-1407542722_thumb.jpg post-13300-0-13245500-1407542795_thumb.jpg

Edited by JUAN EMMANUEL

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JUAN EMMANUEL

Here are the first batch that came from this Wednesday:

A modiolopsis slab, mostly full of whole complete modiolopsises. There are also a bunch of other critters too, like bryozoans, orthocones, and gastropods etc. Im still wondering if this was a mass death caused by a tropical storm or something else because there are also hashes of isotelus parts present on the slab :blink: and also with the complete specimens of modiolopsis. post-13300-0-73808100-1407542989_thumb.jpg

I originally found it wetpost-13300-0-61098800-1407543067_thumb.jpg

Edited by JUAN EMMANUEL

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JUAN EMMANUEL

Here are the modiolopsis. All, if not most, are whole complete specimens. I believe most of them are the species of Modiolopsis concentrica.

post-13300-0-83145200-1407543203_thumb.jpg

This was looks like it was preserved with its mouth openpost-13300-0-65939000-1407543262_thumb.jpg

post-13300-0-86796200-1407543307_thumb.jpg

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JUAN EMMANUEL

More modiolopsis:

post-13300-0-53054000-1407543497_thumb.jpgpost-13300-0-13249600-1407543540_thumb.jpg

Edited by JUAN EMMANUEL

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JUAN EMMANUEL

There were also treptoceras crebiseptums. Yay cephalopods!! :D

post-13300-0-70224800-1407543719_thumb.jpgpost-13300-0-78961000-1407543769_thumb.jpg

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JUAN EMMANUEL

And you have other mollusks as. Here is a cyrtolites:post-13300-0-84309800-1407543857_thumb.jpg

And there's this small bryozoan that I had difficulty photographing: post-13300-0-78707500-1407543959_thumb.jpg

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JUAN EMMANUEL

And here you also have isotelus parts scattered throughout the slab. post-13300-0-08135900-1407544170_thumb.jpg

Some have been hashed up! post-13300-0-77981800-1407544111_thumb.jpg

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JUAN EMMANUEL

post-13300-0-63926200-1407544319_thumb.jpg

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Auspex

That was a good rain :)

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JUAN EMMANUEL

Oh, I almost forgot this one modiolopsis. Its preserved in a diagonal position still burrowed in the matrix.post-13300-0-13207000-1407544404_thumb.jpg

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JUAN EMMANUEL

And I also found what appears to be a another species of modiolopsis. Perhaps modiolopsis ovata? post-13300-0-30382600-1407544786_thumb.jpg This one was a separate specimen from the slab.

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JUAN EMMANUEL

This batch came from today's hunt. Went to the same spot and my find of today would be this whole complete flexicalymene. I was just smashing shale and splitting them all in half mindlessly because I was bored. I was throwing out all the smashed shale debris into the creek's water. All of the sudden when I was just about to throw this shale rock into the water I took a look at it and I saw a complete flexicalymene. post-13300-0-24316800-1407545239_thumb.jpg Glad I noticed it to make a nice save. B) Usually all the flexi's I've found at Mimico creek are incomplete specimens and this is my first complete ( if not my mostly then :P ) specimen. Gotta look at flexi anatomy..... post-13300-0-91709500-1407545877_thumb.jpg

Edited by JUAN EMMANUEL

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JUAN EMMANUEL

And I also found other fossils but I still have to yet identify them post-13300-0-09662200-1407545532_thumb.jpg

I wonder what this one is?? It cant be a cephalopod because it's way too flat and doesn't look like a trilobite part. post-13300-0-56736200-1407545660_thumb.jpgpost-13300-0-17410900-1407545726_thumb.jpg

Enjoy everyone!!

Edited by JUAN EMMANUEL

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Ludwigia

Nice finds! Sorry I can't help with your last one, but I'm sure someone in the know should pipe in soon.

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JUAN EMMANUEL

That was a good rain :)

There's gonna be some coming again this Tuesday or so here at Toronto. :o

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JUAN EMMANUEL

Nice finds! Sorry I can't help with your last one, but I'm sure someone in the know should pipe in soon.

Nah, no worries. I wasn't really interested in it, but still I took photos. I'm just curious as to what it could be......

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FossilDAWG

Your "can"t be a cephalopod" specimen is a cephalopod. When you say "it's too flat", I assume you are influenced by the Treptoceras specimens you have been finding. Treptoceras was an active predator that probably was a fast swimmer, hence the hydrodynamic streamlined round shape to the shell. However other orthoconic nautilods had a pronounced flattened or sometimes triangular cross-section. Often these were larger, heavier forms that probably rested on the sea floor and ambushed their prey . I have specimens of Cameroceras That are markedly flattened on one side from the Georgian Bay Formation in Toronto. I don't see enough features on your specimen to be sure of the identity, but Cameroceras is one possibility.

Nice Flexicalymene! Those are not common to find complete in the Georgian Bay Formation.

Don

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JUAN EMMANUEL

Thanks for the Cameroceras idea, Don. I think I'll go back and retrieve back that specimen to get a closer inspection.

Isn't Cameroceras usually bigger though, like the way how big Endoceras is?

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FossilDAWG

Cameroceras got to be much bigger than Treptoceras, but it started out small. Anyway I can't say for sure that specimen is a Cameroceras, as I can't see any sign of a siphuncle, so that's just one possibility. Lots of orthocones were flattened on one side, presumably where they rested on the sea floor; for example almost all the actinocerids were like this. My point was that it isn't safe to assume something can't be a cephalopod just because it's "too flat".

Don

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Wrangellian

Interesting spot you've found!

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Fire Toad

Great find on the complete flexicalymene.

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