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Harry Pristis

What Are These Strange Bones?

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Harry Pristis

What are these strange bones from the Peace River? I came across these two in a flat of Plio-Pleistocene bones I was sorting yesterday. I thought they must be two of the same species . . . until I started to photograph them. Now, I am not so sure.

I formerly dismissed such bones as sea robin 'noses' or rostra . . . common and not all that interesting. But, these bones cleaned up to be quite interesting (or maybe my attitudes have shifted).

post-42-0-45000700-1420504265_thumb.jpg post-42-0-53905300-1420504285_thumb.jpg post-42-0-66426500-1420504329_thumb.jpg

I can't find much about fish rostra, so I am not sure of any identification. (Years ago, someone at the FSMuseum told me these were sea robin fossils.)

NOT sea robin

Family TRIGLIDAE

Prionotus sp.

Remains of these fish are found as fossils from Late Pliocene to Late Pleistocene, according to Hulbert's book. I have encountered a live sea robin in the Peace River. But . . . are these rostra sea robin remains? Are they even fish rostra?

Tell us something about these bones . . . or just share your Peace River fish stories.

Edit: These bones appear to be the frontal bones ('noses') of porgies or seabream.

Order PERCIFORMES

Family SPARIDAE Rafinesque 1810

Hulbert report four or five different genera of Sparidae from the Plio-Pleistocene of Florida.

Edited by Harry Pristis

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Carl

Can't say I'm a fish expert but I would definitely think these were parts of fish skulls. The bone texture sure looks right. As for whether it's Prionotus or not, I just have a gut feeling it isn't.

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Al Dente

I don't have access to my reference material right now but there is a similar bone in the Smithsonian's Paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine volume 3. I think they identified it as a frontal bone. If you don't have this volume, you can get an electronic version online.

Edit: I just saw your response about these on another thread.

Edited by Al Dente

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Harry Pristis

Yes, a double thank you, Al Dente! I appreciate the lead . . . I didn't think to look at that resource.

These bones appear to be the frontal bones ('noses') of porgies or seabream.

Order PERCIFORMES

Family SPARIDAE Rafinesque 1810

Hulbert report four or five different genera of Sparidae from the Plio-Pleistocene of Florida., none of which is Pagrus, by the way.

post-42-0-56735000-1420586659_thumb.jpg

Edited by Harry Pristis

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