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I_gotta_rock

Cetacean Bone?

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I_gotta_rock

Found this at Flag Ponds Nature Park in Calvert County, MD. It had washed up to the shallows from who knows where. I assume you all know that area is predominantly miocene marine fossils, but some occasional land mammal and bird material. Our guess was maybe cetacean wrist bone, but can't find any matches on whale skeleton diagrams online. Any clues?

post-18129-0-59509000-1429120954_thumb.jpgpost-18129-0-18990800-1429121016_thumb.jpgpost-18129-0-40217700-1429121063_thumb.jpg

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Fossildude19

Maybe a deer astragalus. Looks similar to me.

Other more experienced bone folks should weigh in soon.

Regards,

Edited by Fossildude19

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jcbshark

I'm with Tim on that : )

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Auspex

An astragalus, yes, but I think it is about 30% bigger than that of a White-tailed deer...

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I_gotta_rock

Looking at then pix, definitely not white-tail deer. The sides of the deer astragalus are too deeply grooved. Might be a young bison. Shape generally fits, though mine has obviously been worn down a bit. Much smaller than the ones in Harry's pictures, though. Mine is as long as his are wide.

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siteseer

If it's Miocene or Pliocene, it's too old to be a bison but if it's Miocene-Pliocene, it could be from a camel. Someone who really knows bones would have to determine how worn-down it is. I think it is still identifiable but it would have helped to know the age of the rock it came from. There were entelodonts still in North America during the Early Miocene but I'm not sure they were still around by the time of Calvert Formation deposition, assuming the bone is that old.

Bison arrived in North America during the Pleistocene.

Looking at then pix, definitely not white-tail deer. The sides of the deer astragalus are too deeply grooved. Might be a young bison. Shape generally fits, though mine has obviously been worn down a bit. Much smaller than the ones in Harry's pictures, though. Mine is as long as his are wide.

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I_gotta_rock

Stephen Godfrey at the velvet Marine Museum was kind enough to look into this for me. He and his assistant curator found a dead ringer for it in their collection. The verdict is peccary.

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Fossildude19

Stephen Godfrey at the velvet Marine Museum was kind enough to look into this for me. He and his assistant curator found a dead ringer for it in their collection. The verdict is peccary.

Thanks for the updated answer! :)

Regards,

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Auspex

Bingo! Good work identifying this great fossil :)

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