Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Newberrydc

Cow Tooth?

Recommended Posts

Newberrydc

Can anybody identify this tooth and its approximate age? I'm pretty sure it's a bovine tooth. It was found about 15-20 feet into the surf off the beach at Dauphin Island, AL. I was digging shells and such out from under the sand (under about 2 feet of water) and found this (about 4 inches under the sand under the water) along with the shells I was digging up. It looks to be modern given its condition, but then I'm not sure if this could be from being buried under sand and ocean as well. Any help would be greatly appreciated!!

post-18593-0-61638700-1433535852_thumb.jpg

post-18593-0-11373500-1433535881_thumb.jpg

post-18593-0-20533300-1433535904_thumb.jpg

post-18593-0-81753600-1433536052_thumb.jpg

post-18593-0-09430500-1433536074_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Auspex

It is from a cow, of historic times.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Diceros

I happen to have a cow skull right here, and I make it to be a right upper last molar (rt. M3, in mammal-tooth notation). In spite of the two ft. of water, and four in. of sand, I'd still say this was a molar of a modern cow, Bos taurus - it just has that look. That's not to say that it couldn't have been from the 1800's, from some pioneer southern Alabama cow. By the way, the top row of three pics (ling., lab., & occ.) would have been plenty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Diceros

Sorry Auspex, I really don't believe in saying in 8 words what I could have said in 92 - as they say, the truth is in the details!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Newberrydc

Great...thank you both!! There is a lot of debris (shingles, asphalt, concrete, etc) from structures destroyed in hurricanes. I'm thinking it possibly (probably) belongs to some livestock lost during a hurricane. Thanks again guys...you rock!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RichW9090

Diceros has a penchant for lecturing - here he is instructing a fossil as to what its deeper nature really is:

Dwarskill Earl color

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Diceros

It was the 70's, people dressed in bell-bottoms then!

Note the proximal humerus of the lt. Pleistocene Dwarskill Mastodon (Mammut americanum), from NE New Jersey (i really can't help the explanations, they just pour out). Boy, that was a fun excavation (except for the noisy Canada geese).

I think there's a collector who needs your comments on his Alaskan mammoth tusk tip commented on, on another post, Rich. It must be getting warm in Tucson, now that it's June.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RichW9090

Yes, Dwarskill. Ill post a few more pictures when I get a chance. And yes, it is just beginning to thaw in Tucson. The ice on the Santa Cruz river broke this past week - it finally reached 100 degrees. But I'm in NJ, down in the Cretaceous belt.

Edited by RichW9090

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shellseeker

I am pleased that this discussion of a modern Bos tooth transitioned into a walk down memory lane for two paleontologists who are also obviously good friends.

Thanks for sharing. SS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Diceros

Sorry, there really wasn't anything more to say about the cow tooth.

Good hunting in New Jersey, old friend!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×