Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
fossilcole

Myliobatis Palate (selsey, England

16 posts in this topic

Anyone interested in Ray palates? This one is a whopper and is about 85mm x 85mm. The biggest near complete palate I have found in over 30 years of collecting. This was found in a London Clay gulley at low tide on Selsey Beach, south coast of England. I think it is Myliobatis Dixoni. (Eagle Ray)

post-1392-1237503756_thumb.jpg

post-1392-1237504661_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WOW! that really is nice. All I seem to find is smaller single pieces.

Great find, thanks for sharing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

haha it almost looks like the one i found not to long ago, i would say its from the upper of the mouth, how much curve does it have?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is a really big plate for the time period. Most of my Eocene ray plates are only about 2 inches square or smaller.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't bloody believe that I lived in Chichester for nearly 10 years and didn't find out about that there were fossils on Bracklesham and Selsey beaches until a week before I emigrated to Texas!

Still, the fossils of Texas make up for it, I guess :)

Nice find!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome find!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the individual little bars must have really loved each other to stay together for so long. it's touching.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great ray grinding plate! I have not found any nearly as large and complete as that one.

I notice that you refer to it as Myliobatis sp.; How did you rule out the genus Rhinoptera? Here's a photo of a modern Rhinoptera bonasus jaw from my collection. Rhinoptera and Myliobatis have very similar dentition as I'm sure you know, but according to elasmo.com there is a way of differentiating the two genera, based mostly on root morphology.

jason

post-1000-1237518309_thumb.jpg

post-1000-1237518319_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Anyone interested in Ray palates? This one is a whopper and is about 85mm x 85mm. The biggest near complete palate I have found in over 30 years of collecting. This was found in a London Clay gulley at low tide on Selsey Beach, south coast of England. I think it is Myliobatis Dixoni. (Eagle Ray)

post-1392-1237503756_thumb.jpg

post-1392-1237504661_thumb.jpg

Chris,

Personally I would have left it on the beach for someone to stub their toes on – quite horrid!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Anyone interested in Ray palates? This one is a whopper and is about 85mm x 85mm. The biggest near complete palate I have found in over 30 years of collecting. This was found in a London Clay gulley at low tide on Selsey Beach, south coast of England. I think it is Myliobatis Dixoni. (Eagle Ray)

post-1392-1237503756_thumb.jpg

post-1392-1237504661_thumb.jpg

Wow!

Yes ofcoarse I am interested, I always am, hahahaha.

Regards,

Martijn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice indeed!! Very nice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I can't bloody believe that I lived in Chichester for nearly 10 years and didn't find out about that there were fossils on Bracklesham and Selsey beaches until a week before I emigrated to Texas!

Still, the fossils of Texas make up for it, I guess :)

Nice find!

Hi, check out www.dmap.co.uk fossils and look at the section on Bracklesham. Most of this section are specimens from my collection.

Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris,

Personally I would have left it on the beach for someone to stub their toes on – quite horrid!

I was just removing a hazard from the beach for unsuspecting gastropod and mollusc collectors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Great ray grinding plate! I have not found any nearly as large and complete as that one.

I notice that you refer to it as Myliobatis sp.; How did you rule out the genus Rhinoptera? Here's a photo of a modern Rhinoptera bonasus jaw from my collection. Rhinoptera and Myliobatis have very similar dentition as I'm sure you know, but according to elasmo.com there is a way of differentiating the two genera, based mostly on root morphology.

jason

Thanks.

All the other specimens from this area that I have seen are recorded as Myliobatis.sp . I'll have a look at elasmo.com to see if I can spot the difference.

Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
haha it almost looks like the one i found not to long ago, i would say its from the upper of the mouth, how much curve does it have?

It has a very slight curve.

I do have just a single bar that is 70mm wide and not as robust as this specimen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Great ray grinding plate! I have not found any nearly as large and complete as that one.

I notice that you refer to it as Myliobatis sp.; How did you rule out the genus Rhinoptera? Here's a photo of a modern Rhinoptera bonasus jaw from my collection. Rhinoptera and Myliobatis have very similar dentition as I'm sure you know, but according to elasmo.com there is a way of differentiating the two genera, based mostly on root morphology.

jason

Pristiformes,

The plate shown appears to retain at least a couple of lateral teeth which is uncommon from any fossil site. The lateral teeth of Myliobatis are small, 4-6-sided, and attached directly to the much wider wide medial (central row) teeth (themselves much wider than they are high). In Rhinoptera the teeth attached to the medial teeth are almost as wide with at least two other rows of lateral teeth on either side. Isolated Rhinoptera teeth, particularly the medials, can be difficult to distinguish from those of Myliobatis. In Chondrichthyes II, Cappetta stated that the crown is asymmetrical in labial or lingual view in Rhinoptera (symmetrical in Myliobatis).

I have not seen too many Rhinoptera teeth and am not sure if I've seen a tooth plate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.