Jump to content
Salty

Several Items: Mouth Plate? Ray Barb? Need Id Help!

Recommended Posts

Salty

I need a little help ID'ing a couple of things. I know you guys can help!

The long, skinny barbed piece is that a ray barb? How about the black, semi-circular piece? It looks almost like a miniture set of false teeth! Is it a mouth plate? Then the larger light colored piece-it looks like a barnacle or similar object. it's very light weight as if it's hollow-I haven't cleaned it up real well yet. Then there is the tiny flatter spiky piece with little "teeth". And of course I knew the tooth was a tooth, but it was cool because it was a double toother! Ahhh-double the bite!

Any help would be appreciated! Thank you!

post-17107-0-15343000-1436483048_thumb.jpgpost-17107-0-33099700-1436483080_thumb.jpgpost-17107-0-05530000-1436483083_thumb.jpgpost-17107-0-74473200-1436483087_thumb.jpgpost-17107-0-95125200-1436483092_thumb.jpgpost-17107-0-24918000-1436483111_thumb.jpgpost-17107-0-73708600-1436483112_thumb.jpgpost-17107-0-63089300-1436483114_thumb.jpgpost-17107-0-53443400-1436483146_thumb.jpgpost-17107-0-15229200-1436483151_thumb.jpgpost-17107-0-95318300-1436483155_thumb.jpgpost-17107-0-83863500-1436483182_thumb.jpgpost-17107-0-74725200-1436483184_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lissa318

Stingray barb, pufferfish mouth plate, barnacle bit (I think), piece of stingray crusher plate and not sure what kind of tooth... Cool finds!!! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
old bones

Lissa has got them all right... and the shark tooth looks to be pathological. Nice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Salty

Wow! That was fast! So I was right, it WAS "false teeth" ! I think I am getting a tiny bit better at this--I found a bunch of ray plates-that was the only one with a barbed- so to speak- edge. Found a bunch of teeth, no super sized ones, but some really nice ones and as you can see some little oddities. I was lucky enough to meet a couple of other fossil folks and had a wonderful time! Thanks Lissa!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Salty

Funny how life goes-I used to live in Pennsylvania, and now I live in Western NC, and look who responded-PA and NC! Too funny- thanks ladies!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jcbshark

I'm with Lissa and Julianna : )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lissa318

You're very welcome and that tooth is super cool! I'm sure someone else will chime in about it as well. :D. Puffer fish mouth plates I always think are fun to find. Where are these from? Awesome you got to meet more fossil hunters as well! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Salty

They were found in SC. This is my 2nd time out, and I am hooked! I used to find some interesting things in PA--I bet you have some treasures from there. I wished I would have know then what I know now! I would pick up random fossils and kept a few, but I could have had some humdingers. I lived close to the NY border and could have made quite the haul on Trilobites near Hamburg/ Buffalo- used to go along the lake shore all the time!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
old bones

Funny how life goes-I used to live in Pennsylvania, and now I live in Western NC, and look who responded-PA and NC! Too funny- thanks ladies!

btw, technically speaking, we should refer to the fish mouth plates as burrfish instead of puffer fish. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
old bones

They were found in SC. This is my 2nd time out, and I am hooked! I used to find some interesting things in PA--I bet you have some treasures from there. I wished I would have know then what I know now! I would pick up random fossils and kept a few, but I could have had some humdingers. I lived close to the NY border and could have made quite the haul on Trilobites near Hamburg/ Buffalo- used to go along the lake shore all the time!

Why is it that we so often have to move away from an area, only later to realize that we didn't take advantage of a local treasure while we were there!?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Troodon

Your patho shark tooth looks like it could be a Hammerhead shark, Sphyrna sp.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Auspex

Why is it that we so often have to move away from an area, only later to realize that we didn't take advantage of a local treasure while we were there!?

The grass is always greener on the previous side of the fence. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
siteseer

That ray tooth looks more like Plinthicus, an extinct form known from Lee Creek. I think I've seen specimens from the Bone Valley phosphates.

I think that shark tooth is a hammerhead exemplifying file-splitting. As sharks grow, the mouth widens and the number of tooth files (positions) increases slowly as it does. As space for another file becomes available, a neighboring file can develop wider teeth with two crowns to the point that new teeth behind the two crowned-teeth have developed into separate teeth with one crown each and a new file is fully established.

Jess

Stingray barb, pufferfish mouth plate, barnacle bit (I think), piece of stingray crusher plate and not sure what kind of tooth... Cool finds!!! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Salty

Yes sometimes the grass is greener ;) , but I can't complain now either! Here is couple of pics of some teeth I found during the same day/site. They are my bigger better condition teeth. Thanks for all your help!

post-17107-0-43740300-1436488518_thumb.jpgpost-17107-0-83676900-1436488519_thumb.jpgpost-17107-0-24236500-1436488521_thumb.jpgpost-17107-0-95374100-1436488522_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jcbshark

Very nice teeth! The color on those is beautiful :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sixgill pete

That ray tooth looks more like Plinthicus, an extinct form known from Lee Creek. I think I've seen specimens from the Bone Valley phosphates.

I think that shark tooth is a hammerhead exemplifying file-splitting. As sharks grow, the mouth widens and the number of tooth files (positions) increases slowly as it does. As space for another file becomes available, a neighboring file can develop wider teeth with two crowns to the point that new teeth behind the two crowned-teeth have developed into separate teeth with one crown each and a new file is fully established.

Jess

I agree with Jess on the ray tooth; that it looks like Plinthicus, an extinct ray known from Lee Creek. You said you found these in S.C. may I ask where? Lee Creek is in N.C. All of the teeth you posted in your last picture are teeth that are also common at Lee Creek.

Edited by sixgill pete

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×