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Road Trip! (Cincinnati Area)


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It appears my Sunday fossil hunting this week has become a mini-field trip.

If anyone who lives near Cincinnati, Ohio (USA) wants to join us - the more the merrier!

The site is an hour east of Cincinnati Oho and is nicknamed "Ponderosa Ranch". See the latest Dry Dredgers field trip to this locality at http://www.drydredgers.org/fieldtrips/trip201405p1.htm.

If you would like to join us (so far I have an RSVP from Fossil Claw and jgcox) please "PM" me or email me at billheim@cinci.rr.com and I'll hook you up.

We will be surface collecting a road cut that exposes the basal Corryville Formation (Late Ordovician Cincinnatian Series) and the whole Bellevue formation looking for trilobites, edrioasteroids and oversized brachiopods.

Bill

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Uncle Siphuncle

Wish I could join you guys! But alas, logistics......

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Bill this will be a good time to collect for the kits. We will bring a couple extra 5 gal buckets.

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jgcox, I agree.

For those of you unfamiliar with it, the Dry Dredgers members donate their extra common fossils to our production of "Cincinnati Fossils" kits. These are an Educational Outreach project in which we assemble bags of 12 fossils, identified and sold in the local gift shops. The money we get from the sales goes into running our club, which is not-for-profit, and also goes toward the "Paleo Research Awards" the Dry Dredgers give to paleo research projects who apply for this money each year.

For more info on this award, see http://www.drydredgers.org/paleo_award.html

Bill

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Dry Dredgers is a very classy organization; Kudos!

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Dry Dredgers is a very classy organization; Kudos!

Thanks Auspex.

Everyone in the group brings their own talents to the club. And we have a lot of talented people. Jack Kallmeyer (president) travels around in behalf of the group and hears a lot of comments that we are lucky to have a very supportive set of local professional paleontologists who come to the meetings and participate as valued members. They take us under their wing and help us with our amateur projects. These and other members have been with the group a long time and are heavily invested in ensuring its success.

Maybe someday all fossil clubs can have such great support!

Bill

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well the road trip was partially successful. the first site we could not get to because of all the rain we have had state route 125 was closed due to road buckling and high water 1/4 mile from site 1. We took a detour and made it to site two where we all melted down in 95 degree heat. We collected almost 3 hours and I will try to get photos from everyone to show our finds.

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Always good collecting down in the Cincinnatian. Maybe I'll get back there next year but not in the stifling summer heat. Would like to see some pics of what you guys found!

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Fossil Claw

Also found a couple of cephalopod pieces that I passed on to jgcox to use in dry dredger fossil kits.

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Due to the heat we only got to collect a couple of hours. I found two very nice Hebertellas, several Platystrophia sp. and a cephalopod piece that we found an Amphilichas shideleri trilobite phygidium embedded in it, under the microscope it appears there is more under the matrix. A question could this be an example of predation or habitation?

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A question could this be an example of predation or habitation?

The latest research by Richard A. Davis suggests that in addition to the common coincidence of dead trilobites as debris filling the shells of dead Cephalopods, there appears to be a few that indicate trilobites were hiding from predators in dead cephalopod shells.

Dr. Davis's article was published in Lethaia (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1080/002411601300068251/abstract)

Bill

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