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Very Unusual Megalodon In Phosphate Matrix Specimen - I Need Some Advice

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Fossil_Rocks

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This tooth in matrix has been sitting on a local diver's desk for about three years, under a dust cover, and has remained very stable.

We think the matrix is essentially a phosphatic nodule. It's basically a piece of the ACE River Basin river bottom, and obviously it's an amazing specimen.

I wanted to prep. it using a hardener, but I've never prepped any fossils before, and wasn't sure which product that I should use. I've heard of Butvar, of course and know people use it on bone, but this isn't bone, it's more mineral.

Should I dip, or brush? It would seem a lot cheaper to brush it on. I'd also like something that would be water proof, afterwards.

Any thoughts or ideas would be greatly appreciated. I'd also like some direction on a reputable seller of the product. Any folks here in that biz? If you are, then I'd rather throw the biz to a member, but I will need the product over nighted to me.

I want to do the job myself, and I won't be doing a lot of prep. work, so I don't need a ton of the stuff, just enough for this one piece, which measure's about 10" in length.

Here's a list of products that are advertised on a site called PaleoPortal Fossil Preparation. - http://preparation.paleo.amnh.org/47/adhesives-and-consolidants

Solution adhesives which set by evaporation of a solvent and include:
  • Paraloid B-72 (ethyl methacrylate co-polymer, formerly called Acryloid)
  • Butvar B-76 (polyvinyl butyral, or PVB)
  • Butvar B-98 (polyvinyl butyral or PVB)
  • McGean B-15 (polyvinyl acetate or PVAC, formerly called Vinac B-15)
  • “White glue” dispersions and emulsions (e.g. Elmers, Rhoplex, Lascaux) - Not Waterproof, so not my choice

Thanks in Advance, guys ...

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Foozil

I don't know about you but i think it looks great in the rock as it is, it is very interesting.

Cool find :)

Izak

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Mike from North Queensland

I use paraloid B72 to coat and consolidate my fossils but only when needed.

The tooth should not need any coating and I doubt any of the paraloid would even soak into the tooth as no cracks seem present.

Unsure how fragile the marine growth is but if stable you really do not need to coat with anything unless you want to give the specimen a glossier finish.

If you do decide to coat the specimen a brush will work fine. just remember to coat an area at a time and do not try to coat over if the initial surface is still moist.

As the specimen looks to come out of a marine (salt) environment it may be best to soak in fresh water for a week or so then let dry out completely to remove all salt.

Interesting specimen, if it was mine I would maybe remove a little of the growth from the top of the tooth but not much.

Mike

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Gizmo

I doubt at this point it needs any hardeners, I'd leave it alone.

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snolly50

I can see no value in coating this piece in any way - unless it is to be handled quite a bit, e.g. passed around a classroom. If it were mine it would go into a display case and safely rest there without worry of deterioration.

It's a lovely, interesting piece, thanks for posting it.

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Raggedy Man

I wouldn't touch it. It looks remarkable the way it is.

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Auspex

Looks like it's worm encrusted, too; very cool! I would keep it au naturel.

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RJB

Very nice to see a shark tooth still in matrix. I would leave it alone.

RB

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sixgill pete

I too, would leave it just as it is. That is an amazing display piece.

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Fossil_Rocks

I don't know about you but i think it looks great in the rock as it is, it is very interesting.

Cool find :)

Izak

Well, I tend to agree, but moisture could affect this over time.I'm also concerned that it might get dust on it, and it would be easier to dust, if it had a waterproof coating on it.

I use paraloid B72 to coat and consolidate my fossils but only when needed.

The tooth should not need any coating and I doubt any of the paraloid would even soak into the tooth as no cracks seem present.

Unsure how fragile the marine growth is but if stable you really do not need to coat with anything unless you want to give the specimen a glossier finish.

If you do decide to coat the specimen a brush will work fine. just remember to coat an area at a time and do not try to coat over if the initial surface is still moist.

As the specimen looks to come out of a marine (salt) environment it may be best to soak in fresh water for a week or so then let dry out completely to remove all salt.

Interesting specimen, if it was mine I would maybe remove a little of the growth from the top of the tooth but not much.

Mike

It's already dry, and I see no evidence of salt remaining, of course that doesn't mean much just looking at it.

As for cleaning up this tooth a bit, I tend to agree, but my preference is the more rustic look.

Again, my primary concern is the stability over a long period of time, with humidity, and I live on the coast.

Edited by Fossil_Rocks

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Fossil_Rocks

Looks like it's worm encrusted, too; very cool! I would keep it au naturel.

Thanks ...

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fossilselachian

Why even consider doing anything to such an outstanding specimen?? The matrix appears stable and the large meg is not going anywhere. A great conversation piece as well as a great addition to any collection. Le' vr alone.

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Auspex

If you coat it, you will reduce its value.

(That should hit home... ;) )

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abyssunder

Looks gorgeous in this assemblage with the worms. I suggest, leave it as is. :)

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snolly50

This link has a section on preserving teeth etc. I would keep yours like it is. It looks good, and different.

http://nautarch.tamu.edu/CRL/conservationmanual/ConservationManual.pdf

Thanks for posting that pdf. It looks like it will be interesting to read and may certainly prove useful to me at some time. This Forum is a great resource.

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Raggedy Man

You could always use a sealed case. One that protects against moisture. Just adding another option to the table.

Paul

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Troodon

I'll echo what others have said leave it alone, do nothing. I have Megs from Lee Creek on matrix, very similiar to yours, that I've enjoyed for years with nothing being done to them.

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njfossilhunter

I know guys that dive for these teeth and they tell me that you need to soak it in fresh water for a certain amount of time depending on what it is and how large as well ,,you need to change the water ...with your specimen ,,every 5 days or so for maybe up to a month...or more..I would get a salt testing kit and check the salt content before changing the water to see how much salt if any is left....IMHO.

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Fossil_Rocks

Thanks to all who contributed to solving my puzzle.

I decided to leave it, as is.

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Mike from North Queensland

Good decision :)

Mike

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Ludwigia

Agreed. That piece really spurs the imagination.

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caldigger

"Oh they pump these things out in China by the thousands, its worthless!" NOT!!!!! It looks really cool the way it is, I am glad you decided to leave as is. A very interesting conversational show piece.

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