Troodon

My Jurassic Park: Theropod Claws From The Kem Kem

17 posts in this topic

The Kem Kem Beds are full of poorly understood Dinosaurs but the isolated material that wind up in collections are beautiful. The Beds consist of three formations: Ifezouane, Aoufous and Akrabou. I believe the first one is your primary Dinosaur producing layer in the Cenomanian age.

The teeth that we see bombarding us at shows and online give us clues to the spectacular dinosaurs that roamed that region. Claws give us another perspective and by associating them to other regions we obtain more hints of what they looked like.

A Dinosaur that no one needs introduction is Spinosaurus. I happen to have a beautiful hand and two foot claws. A small hand claw also appears to be that of an infant Spinosaurs or another related species.

Spino1a.jpgSpino1.jpgSpino2.jpg

SpinoFoot1.jpgSpinoFoot1a.jpg

SpinoFoot1b.jpg

Another Dinosaur that collectors are familiar with is Carcharodontosaurus. I cannot say definitively that this is a hand claw from one but it closely resembles those found in South America.

Carch1.jpgCarch1a.jpg

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Another group of Dinosaurs are Abelisaurids. These type of claws have been described at a family level and some day we may understand the species.

post-10935-0-87742400-1441312470_thumb.jpgpost-10935-0-28233600-1441312474_thumb.jpgpost-10935-0-00493100-1441312478_thumb.jpg

This claw resembles Dromaeosauid claws from other localities

.post-10935-0-13454600-1441312585_thumb.jpg

The following are from unknown theropods

post-10935-0-68496100-1441312681_thumb.jpgpost-10935-0-94732300-1441312677_thumb.jpg

post-10935-0-76365600-1441312684_thumb.jpgpost-10935-0-59137200-1441312687_thumb.jpg

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Remarkable variety!

A question from the unlearned: did Theropods have dew claws, and are they identifiable as such?

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Remarkable variety!

A question from the unlearned: did Theropods have dew claws, and are they identifiable as such?

Yes on most but some in families like Ornithomimidae they do not. If you know claws of a specific species you can recognize a Digit I (Dew) Claw. The base is not as formed because its not needed for propulsion but its not easy.

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Very impressive, nice job at collecting all the varieties of theropods from that collection. They're in great condition also! Has any type of work been done on them?

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Very impressive, nice job at collecting all the varieties of theropods from that collection. They're in great condition also! Has any type of work been done on them?

Very very little on a couple not like what you see today and I just won't buy them. A number of these claws were acquired years ago when they were finding better quality material in the Kem Kem. Those days are gone and the localities are more remote with poorer preservation

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That's impressive indeed Troodon, some collection that is!

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I've been looking at skeletal images of Giganotosaurus which is a Carcharodontosaurid from South American and the Carch claw I identified as a foot is probably a hand claw. Its very compressed and makes more sense. I cannot edit my page 1 post so here is the new photo. Still not 100% sure what it is but the candidate list is tiny and its size fits a very large theropod so Carch is a good candidate. Comparative identification is a great tool for Kem Kem material but its still guess work.

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I omitted to post a few Kem Kem claws so here they are. The first one is why I looked at the Giganotosaurus skeleton. It appears to be a Carcharodontosaurus foot claw but if someone has a better call I'm all ears. Again just not a lot of theropod info out there.

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post-10935-0-17811600-1441800417_thumb.jpgpost-10935-0-59954500-1441800420_thumb.jpg

 

Here is an Ornithomimid foot claw

post-10935-0-25543200-1441800438_thumb.jpgpost-10935-0-71368300-1441800441_thumb.jpg

 

 

A couple of unknown theropod claws:

post-10935-0-22799000-1441800424_thumb.jpgpost-10935-0-94811400-1441800426_thumb.jpg

 

 

post-10935-0-25954800-1441800431_thumb.jpgpost-10935-0-32712500-1441800435_thumb.jpg

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This might be a silly question but how prevalent is restoration as it pertains to dinosaur claws? I know it's something of an issue with large Megs although honesty about restorative work on these teeth seem to be , thank goodness, the norm.

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Not a silly question. I collect Megs so I understand what's going on. Most Meg dealers will be upfront about repair work done on teeth and there is some nice work out there. Dinosaur claws are much more fragile so a significantly larger percentage have some damage to them when they are collected. Restoration/repair although not ideal is a common practice on claws and much more accepted by some collectors. The problem is that it's hard for an untrained eye to see the restoration and even harder if your buying from a photo. Also the history of the repair/resto gets lost quickly has it changes hands. Most dealers will tell you what they know. Depending on his skill level and quality of repair he may or may not see all the work done to the claw. The best way to buy one is in person so that you can examine it. If that not possible at least have the ability to return it if it does not meet your expectation. .

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Have not posted to this Jurassic Park series for quite a while so let's catch up.

 

A showpeice of any Moroccan collection is a nice Spinosaurid hand claw, well I already have one so the next best thing is a bigger one which this fits the bill.  

 

Spinosaurid indet:

58c995829ad3a_SpinoHandD16W.thumb.jpg.8eab48bf988e0d4c034fcb5763675c35.jpg58c995a76b224_SpinoHandA-D16W.thumb.jpg.569b7cc6d61112a0fd7b4032cde7322b.jpg

 

Theropod indet.:

These obscure claws are very hard to identify.

 

 The first one I've called a hand claw because it's very compressed and not recurved but it could equally belong to the foot 

 

58c996eea41a9_TheroIndetclaw-D85K.thumb.jpg.4af463379e64566fa06f65d9e5e667e1.jpg58c9972eb16ef_TheroIndetclawA-D85K.thumb.jpg.1054b0836d4f9cab52f759e428393b5c.jpg

 

This next claw I'm saying it's theropod but would not shock me if it belongs to a reptile.  It's definitely a foot claw.

 

58c997094dcfd_TheroIndetclaw-D85L.thumb.jpg.7361bf6b19408374f305b2035b7130a3.jpg58c997491b36f_TheroIndetclawA-D85L.thumb.jpg.201e0a65ec095a6b44038937fb8c6760.jpg

 

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Very nice spino claw!!

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Holy smokes that Spinosaurid claw is huge!  Nice addition to your collection! :) 

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7 inches?!

 

Woe betide the fish that falls into the Spinosaurus's radar.

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thanks for the photos

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