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DPS Ammonite

Texas North Sulphur River Lagerstätte

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DPS Ammonite

I found these 2 types of near perfect bivalves in the North Sulphur River (Cretaceous Ozan or Wolf City Formations) a fraction of a km upstream from the highway 2675 bridge east of Ben Franklin, Texas. The first 2 photos might be Anomia argentaria (commonly known as jingle shells) preserved as original shiny silvery grey shells. They are about 2 cm wide. The second 2 photos are of 4 oysters. Note the top left one with both top and bottom shells that are attached to an Inoceramus clam. I think that these might be Pseudoperna congesta since they are found in colonies attached to Inoceramus clams. The bottom shells that are attached in colonies to Inoceramus clams are common North Texas fossils. The top shells are rarely preserved.

Do you think my IDs are correct?

Anyone have good pictures of the interior of the top shell of Pseudoperna congesta oysters (which would help with their ID)?

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Auspex

Now those are some neat hitch hikers! You must have been close to the source stratum.

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DPS Ammonite

Here are 3 more photos of the possible Pseudoperna congesta. 35mm long.

Photo 1: Looking down at top of both shells.

Photo 2: Inside of both shells.

Photo 3: Bottom of shells attached to Inoceramus clam.

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Auspex

Interesting. What other epibionts do you find on Inoceramus there?

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jpc

Neat stuff, but I am not sure the NSR is worthy of being called a Laggerstatte.

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Auspex

... I am not sure the NSR is worthy of being called a Laggerstatte.

Depends on what definition you use. It falls short of the likes of Messel, Mazon Creek, or Green River, but still the whole ecosystem seems to be preserved to a degree. Maybe call it a "laggerstette"? ;)

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JarrodB

I found these 2 types of near perfect bivalves in the North Sulphur River (Cretaceous Ozan or Wolf City Formations) a fraction of a km upstream from the highway 2675 bridge east of Ben Franklin, Texas. The first 2 photos might be Anomia argentaria (commonly known as jingle shells) preserved as original shiny silvery grey shells. They are about 2 cm wide. The second 2 photos are of 4 oysters. Note the top left one with both top and bottom shells that is attached to an Inoceramus clam. I think that these might be Pseudoperna congesta since they are found in colonies attached to Inoceramous clams. The bottom shells that are attached in colonies to Inoceramous clams are common North Texas fossils. The top shells are rarely preserved.

Do you think my IDs are correct?

Anyone have good pictures of the interior of the top shell of Pseudoperna congesta oysters (which would help with their ID)?

Nice find. Was that bridge still hard to get up and down?

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DPS Ammonite

JarrodB,

Last time I was there in 2012 the approach to the river was very steep and had deep mud- a bad combination.

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bbrosen

I know that spot, yea, it's still a bear, but worth it, really nice find

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