Jump to content
Triceratops

Sharpening images.

Recommended Posts

Triceratops

Hello all!

At the moment the only camera I have is a 3.15MP phone camera with no flash. Because of this any pictures of small fossils I take are fuzzy. Can anyone suggest a app or online photo editor I can use to help sharpen and focus my fossil pictures until I upgrade my phone or get a proper camera. Also any tips on taking photos of smaller objects like fossils would be appreciated!

Below are some pictures of belemnites taken with my phone camera today, so you can see how they come out.

post-15455-0-37928500-1450753174_thumb.jpg

post-15455-0-70829600-1450753209_thumb.jpg

Thanks a lot,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
snolly50

3MP or so is doable.

Don't get so close that you are getting "inside" the lens ability to focus - there is a minimum distance. You can "zoom" by cropping after getting a properly focused image. Of course, as you digitally "zoom" the image contains fewer pixels - so you can only push it so far.

Go outside. The more light you have the better.

Have fun.

Edit: Oh, and take lots of pictures - it increases the odds of lucking into a good shot. With digital it doesn't cost like film - only some inconvenienced electrons and some battery juice.

Edited by snolly50

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Triceratops

Thanks Snolly, I will definitely try these techniques!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Auspex

The camera will focus better in bright light.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ElToro

Yea, I only have a 5mp camera and have to make do. My pics are VERY amateurish but if I go outside in the sun and get to the minimum distance for focus, they turn out OK.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Triceratops

Thanks Auspex and ElToro, I'll try to take my photo in the middle of the day when it's brighter, rather than in the morning or afternoon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ElToro

I do have to say that my camera doesn't seem to like direct sunlight on the fossil however. If its bright enough outside my living room is fine. I just took photos of my Wheeler Shale Anomalocaris and its a black print on a black background. Didn't work outside at all. Had to hold it and the phone at a funny angle, inside. Ended up not too bad...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ElToro

Photo

post-20038-0-42746200-1450856067_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Auspex

Photo

It would be even better, me thinks, with more light:

post-423-0-38094300-1450875589_thumb.jpg

Here it is brightened, but there is a lot of detail that went uncaptured, or that was obscured by the needed bump in contrast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ElToro

It would be even better, me thinks, with more light:

attachicon.gif~.jpg

Here it is brightened, but there is a lot of detail that went uncaptured, or that was obscured by the needed bump in contrast.

I tried all sorts of light and it mostly reflected the fossil. I even got pics where the it's a bright silver! I never tried using apps or programs to manipulate my photos. I need to get into it....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Auspex

Managing highly reflective surfaces is difficult. Diffuse, indirect lighting is needed, but plenty of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ElToro

Managing highly reflective surfaces is difficult. Diffuse, indirect lighting is needed, but plenty of it.

Thanx. Yea, its pretty hard! I'm going to invest in a proper camera which may help a little.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Triceratops

It would be even better, me thinks, with more light:

attachicon.gif~.jpg

Here it is brightened, but there is a lot of detail that went uncaptured, or that was obscured by the needed bump in contrast.

The brighter light certainly makes the fossil easier to pick out, what program did you use to edit the photo?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Auspex

The brighter light certainly makes the fossil easier to pick out, what program did you use to edit the photo?

The very basic Microsoft Office Picture Manager. It came loaded on my ancient laptop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sagebrush Steve

A couple of easy things you can do: first, if you have access to close-up lenses that are designed for an SLR camera you can just hold one in front of your lens and it will let you focus closer to the object. (You can buy sets online fo $15 or less). They often come in sets of three, typically rated at +1, +2, and +4 diopters.  If any one of these doesn't let you get close enough you can screw any two or all three together to get closer.  I took the photo below with my iPhone 5 and a +4 diopter close-up lens held by hand in front of the lens.   The fossil was illuminated by natural light coming from a window covered by a translucent white shade.  I just had to make sure the shadow of my hand and camera didn't fall in the picture.Ruler.jpg

 

For very small objects I have had success shooting through a 10x magnifier.  It works best using the larger ones with stands.  The small handheld magnifiers don't have big enough diameter lenses so you get vignetting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×