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sixgill pete

2015 North Carolina Cretaceous Finds

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sixgill pete

2015 afforded to the opportunity to add some very nice new Cretaceous items to my collection from here in North Carolina. North Carolina offers several different formations of Cretaceous goodies. The Black Creek Group includes the Tarheel, Bladen and Donoho Creek Formations, all Campanian. Then of course there is the PeeDee, deposited during the Maastrichtian.

This post will be photo heavy so it will take several posts from me to get everything in.

First some of the Echinoids.

These two Hardounia mortonis came from a sand pit in Pender County and are from the PeeDee Formation. Note that there are spines on both sides of these. Many of the echinoids from this location are exceptionally preserved.

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Next are Schizaster variabilis. These are the first 3 of this species that I have found, so they were welcome additions, also from the PeeDee Formation. One of these came from a location on the North East Cape Fear river, the others from the Brunswick River.

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sixgill pete

Lets throw in some verts before the final echinoid. I believe these are ray verts. From a site in Wayne County, Black Creek Group. Possibly Tarheel Formation.

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This final echinoid, also from the PeeDee is one that was very unexpected to find. It is in rather poor shape, but I believe it is Catopygus mississippiensis, but any and all other thoughts are welcome. From the North east Cape Fear River site.

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another pic to follow in next post

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sixgill pete

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Also from the North East Cape Fear, I posted this when I found it while in matrix. I have exposed this much of it. The jaw bone broke, but can be fixed, Still working on the rest of the jaw bone, hoping there are more teeth.

Enchodus ferox

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Edited by sixgill pete

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sixgill pete

one more pic of the Enchodus ferox

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Ray Teeth, Rhombodus binkhorsti. Wayne County.

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Coprolites from the Wayne County site. Shark? Croc? Dino?

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Also from Wayne County, a fish tooth, Stephanodus minimus. First from N.C.

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Wayne County, Ischyrhiza mira. These are rather common here, but on the small side.

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Edited by sixgill pete

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sixgill pete

Everything else is from the Wayne County site.

Anomaedus phaseolus

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Shark Teeth, place the cursor on the tooth and it's ID will show. I have ID'd these the best I could if you have other ideas please share.

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sixgill pete

more shark

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sixgill pete

shark .......

post-4130-0-50440400-1451962155_thumb.jpg post-4130-0-95921200-1451962244_thumb.jpg

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sixgill pete

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and an unknown tooth. Not sure about this ID

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sixgill pete

and last, but definately not least. My first and only Dinosaur tooth. From the Wayne County site, Black Creek Group. most likely Tarheel Formation. I have posted this before, but I believe it seserves an encore. Dino material is extremely rare here in N.C.

Hadrosaur; formal I.D. Hadrosaurid indet.

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ZiggieCie

Great assemblage of your fossils. It takes a lot of work to put these together. Very nice job. :goodjob:

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JohnJ

Certainly a year of special fossils. Thanks for sharing your finds, Don. ;)

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jpc

very nice... thanks for sharing.

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non-remanié

I would say the 1st and 2nd shark teeth are Scapanorhynchus instead of Archaeolamna and Carcharias. Great finds!

EDIT: Actually I'm thinking the first one is probably C. samhammeri, not Archaeolamna. The 2nd is Scapanorhynchus not C. samhammeri.

Everything else is from the Wayne County site.

Anomaedus phaseolus

attachicon.gifAnomaeodus phaseolus.JPG

Shark Teeth, place the cursor on the tooth and it's ID will show. I have ID'd these the best I could if you have other ideas please share.

attachicon.gifArcheolamna kopingensis.jpg attachicon.gifCarcharias samhammeri.JPG

attachicon.gifCarcharias samhammeri 2.JPG attachicon.gifCretalamna appendiculata.JPG

attachicon.gifCretalman appendiculata in matrix.JPG

Edited by non-remanié

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sixgill pete

Great assemblage of your fossils. It takes a lot of work to put these together. Very nice job. :goodjob:

Ziggie, thanks for the comment and yes, it is rather time consuming to put a post like this together. But, I enjoy sharing my finds. I wish I had more time to do it as I find them, than I have had recently.

Certainly a year of special fossils. Thanks for sharing your finds, Don. ;)

Thanks John. Going to be sending you a PM soon.

Edited by sixgill pete

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sixgill pete

I would say the 1st and 2nd shark teeth are Scapanorhynchus instead of Archaeolamna and Carcharias. Great finds!

EDIT: Actually I'm thinking the first one is probably C. samhammeri, not Archaeolamna. The 2nd is Scapanorhynchus not C. samhammeri.

Thanks for your thoughts on these two teeth, Cretaceous teeth seem to be the hardest for me to ID. Especially the "sand tigers".

Unknown looks like an anterior Pseudocorax perhaps

Interesting, an I.D. that I did not consider, but I can see the possibility. Will have to do some research on this as I personally have not came across that ID for a North Carolina tooth. (Like that means something!!!)

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Auspex

I'm scrolling this topic, and my eyes are just getting bigger and bigger. Well done!

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sixgill pete

Thanks Chas, glad you enjoyed.

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SailingAlongToo

We truly are lucky to have such great fossil collecting sites throughout NC, VA and MD. Eastern NC is one of my favorite places to collect. I was hoping to get in another collecting day there in Dec. but the water levels wouldn't cooperate.

Well done putting this together and thanks for sharing.

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Plax

maybe something Eocene for your unknown? Just a wild guess.

Really appreciate the pics of the Peedee echinoids. thanks

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sixgill pete

maybe something Eocene for your unknown? Just a wild guess.

Really appreciate the pics of the Peedee echinoids. thanks

Anytime Don. I did consider Eocene for that tooth, Don as we both know there is Castle Hayne at that site also. But, at least to me, it does not match anything quite right. May post it on the I.D. forum.

B.T.W. I have one of the Brunswick River S. variabilis for you next time we get together.

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sixgill pete

We truly are lucky to have such great fossil collecting sites throughout NC, VA and MD. Eastern NC is one of my favorite places to collect. I was hoping to get in another collecting day there in Dec. but the water levels wouldn't cooperate.

Well done putting this together and thanks for sharing.

You are absolutely correct about the great collecting here in this part of the country, SailingAlong. And yes the water levels have been very uncooperative as of late. Thanks for the response.

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Al Dente

Nice finds for the year. I think I would call the fish tooth Enchodus instead of Xiphactinus. I'm not familiar with the jaws of Xiphactinus but from photos it looks like the teeth fit into sockets unlike some Enchodus teeth that extend from the bone itself.

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sixgill pete

Thanks Eric. I think I am going to add the photos of the fish tooth to a post in the ID section. I thought the tooth was enchodus at first, but after posting it I got several opinions that it was Xiphactinus. Now that this much of it has been prepped out of the matrix maybe others will agree with your assessment. Thanks again.

Edit: After looking at my original post again and doing some research, I now fully agree that the tooth is Enchodus. ID to be changed.

Edited by sixgill pete

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non-remanié

Think I was one of the might be original Xiphactinus opinions, but I think I have to agree with Eric. Now seeing everything exposed it does look like Enchodus from the tooth attachment. But I also have not seen Xiphactinus vetus jaw sections to compare with. And the base looks like a solid match for Enchodus. I cant make any judgment from the tooth itself. It still looks a lot more like Xiphactinus to me...except maybe its a bit too thick. Anyway, just goes to illustrate the ID difficulties that is seen in a lot of NJ posts about this type of material.

As for the Cretaceous sand tigers... I definitely hear ya! I dont think they are well described and sand tigers seem a mess in general to me. I might also disagree with your O. aculeatus ID, but it wasn't at all worth quibbling over. Lots of grey area IMO.

Knowing there is eocene at the site, I would have to consider that a possibility as well for the unknown.

Nice finds for the year. I think I would call the fish tooth Enchodus instead of Xiphactinus. I'm not familiar with the jaws of Xiphactinus but from photos it looks like the teeth fit into sockets unlike some Enchodus teeth that extend from the bone itself.

Thanks Eric. I think I am going to add the photos of the fish tooth to a post in the ID section. I thought the tooth was enchodus at first, but after posting it I got several opinions that it was Xiphactinus. Now that this much of it has been prepped out of the matrix maybe others will agree with your assessment. Thanks again.

Edit: After looking at my original post again and doing some research, I now fully agree that the tooth is Enchodus. ID to be changed.

Edited by non-remanié

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