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Identifying Theropod Teeth from Uzbekistan


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Theropod teeth from Uzbekistan typically are not seen for sale other than those from Tyrannosaurs. Opportunities always make themselves available so I decided to put a quick post out on those that have had some scientific research. I also think it's cool to see some of these teeth. We are looking at teeth from the Bissekty Formation, Touronian in age from the Kyzylkum Desert from the following two locations Dzharakuduk and Uchkuduk. There are younger and older deposits in this Desert but all of the teeth sold appear to be coming from those two localities. Changes to what is presented here most certainty will occur with continued research, understanding and new discoveries.

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Bissekty Tyrannosaurid: Tyrannosaurid indet.   (in 2016 this was described as Timurlengia euotica)

The Tyrannosaur from this locality has yet to be described. Once thought to be Alectrosaurus it is now viewed as a different Tyrannosaur.

The Premaxillary teeth may or may not be serrated. They are your typically D shaped tooth. (17.5-27.5 denticles per 5mm) The scale bar represents 1mm.

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The Maxillary and Dentary teeth are typically very compressed (flattened) and recurved. Both carinae are serrated and have the same size denticles. Crowns can be quite different, some long and blade like others short and more stout. (12-22 denticles per 5mm on distal carina) The scale bar represents 1mm

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https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S019566711100187X

 

Troodontid: Urbacondon sp.

There are three taxa of troodontid dinosaurs recognized from the Kyzylkum Desert. Urbacondon itemirensis from the Cenomanian for the Dharakuduk Fm, an Indeterminate Troodontid from the Khodzhakul Formation and Urbacondon sp from the Bissekty Formation.

The teeth are not common and only four teeth have been identified. A premaxillary tooth, anterior dentary tooth and a pair of maxillary or dentary teeth. Quite distinctive easy to identify.

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https://www.researchgate.net/publication/284813177_Troodontidae_Dinosauria_Theropoda_from_the_Upper_Cretaceous_of_Uzbekistan

 

Therizinosauroid indet

Therizinosaurs are among the most common theropod in terms of skeletal remains found. At least two undescribed taxa are present in the Bissekty Formation. Their teeth are small but easily identifiable. They are found with either conical and lanceolate crowns. The scale bar represents 1mm.

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https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195667115301117

 

Dromaeosaurid: Itemirus medullaris

Dromaeosaurid remains are among the least common theropod found in this region. Teeth however are numerous. Like all Dromaeosaurid teeth there is a distinct difference between the size and density of serrations along the mesial and distal carinae. The distal denticles are always much larger. Anterior teeth have the medial carina twist. (3-6 denticles per 1mm on distal carina)

If the serrations are identical it most likely is a Tyrannosaur or another Indeterminate Theropod.

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http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195667114001189?via%3Dihub

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Enigmatic Teeth:

Paronychodon asiaticus

Richardoestesia asiaticus

These teeth are very similar to those found in North America and like those they are only described by isolated teeth. The North American teeth are being studied and their findings will most likely affect the status of these two species. The scale bar represents 1mm.

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A new paper by Alexander Averianov and Hans-Dieter Sues examines different morphologies of Richardoestesia asiaticus
 

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02724634.2019.1614941

 

Screenshot_20190618-131451.jpg.e1973e8a3cff02dac5958a26b741cb00.jpgScreenshot_20190618-131425.jpg.198df83290c116c79e40a8a138bd3fa4.jpgScreenshot_20190618-131400.thumb.jpg.15e96a00f0d62d2ddfc4e3c68b741fc2.jpg

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Yes but there are more basal ones known from early Cretaceous of Europe and Asia.

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Nice post Troodon.

Can you post the reference or PDF so I can access it and download it?

Thanks.

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Thanks. I'll get them from Hans.

Edited by hxmendoza
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  • 4 weeks later...

Timurlengia euotica is a newly described tyrannosauroid from Uzbekistan by Hans-Dieter Sues et al. Its name is in reference to the fourteenth century Central Asian ruler Timurleng. Euotica meaning "well eared" in reference to the large inner ear of the holotype.  Its placement with other tyrannosaurs is still uncertain.

The newly described tyrannosaur diagnosis was based on the braincase. The skeletal reconstruction, however, were from bones (including a braincase identical to the holotype) of different individuals from the same horizon as the holotype and of the same body size.

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The reconstruction bones were the same Hans-Dieter Sues used in his 2011 paper describing the Bissekty tyrannosaurid. So I think its reasonable to say that the teeth identified as the Bissekty Tyrannosaurid or Alectrosaurus can now be called:

Timurlengia euotica

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Timurlengia euotica is a newly described tyrannosaurid from Uzbekistan by Hans-Dieter Sues et al. Its name is in reference to the fourteenth century Central Asian ruler Timurleng. Euotica meaning "well eared" in reference to the large inner ear of the holotype.

The newly described tyrannosaur diagnosis was based on the braincase. The skeletal reconstruction, however, were from bones (including a braincase identical to the holotype) of different individuals from the same horizon as the holotype and of the same body size.

attachicon.gifUZ tyranno.jpg

The reconstruction bones were the same Hans-Dieter Sues used in his 2011 paper describing the Bissekty tyrannosaurid. So I think its reasonable to say that the teeth identified as the Bissekty Tyrannosaurid or Alectrosaurus can now be called:

Timurlengia euotica

Wonderful! I'm glad I got one from down under fossil hunter ^^

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  • 2 years later...

New paper on different morphologies of Richardoestesia asiaticus is added above.

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  • 1 year later...
Troodon

 Something new in the Bissekty Formation.   This was presented at the SVP conference late in 2020.   Have yet to see a paper on it.

 

A LARGE NEOVENATORID (DINOSAURIA: THEROPODA) FROM THE UPPER CRETACEOUS BISSEKTY FORMATION (TURONIAN), UZBEKISTAN Tanaka, Kohei1 , Anvarov, Otabek U.1 , Ahmedshaev, Akhmadjon2 , Kobayashi, Yoshitsugu3 1 Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan, 2 State Geological Museum of the State Committee of the Republic of Uzbekistan on Geology and Mineral Resources, Tashkent, Uzbekistan, 3 Hokkaido University Museum, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan Neovenatoridae is a group of medium to large-sized predatory theropods, distributed worldwide during the Cretaceous. Previous studies suggested that neovenatorids and other large-bodied theropods (Ceratosauridae, Carcharodontosauridae, and Spinosauridae) were apex predators in Laurasia until tyrannosauroids occupied top predatory niches in the last 20 million years of the Late Cretaceous, implying that the evolution of gigantism of tyrannosauroids is likely influenced by the presence of these large theropods. Nevertheless, co-occurrences of small tyrannosauroids and large neovenatorids are scarcely known, with only two cases in the Early Cretaceous (Barremian) of the U.K. and the mid-Cretaceous (Cenomanian) of the U.S.A. Here we report on a new specimen of a large neovenatorid, represented by an isolated maxilla, from the Upper Cretaceous (Turonian) Bissekty Formation of the Kyzylkum Desert, the Republic of Uzbekistan, where the small tyrannosauroid Timurlengia has been previously reported. This new specimen preserves a main body of the left maxilla (24.2 x 13.1 cm), missing the ascending ramus and posterior half of the jugal ramus. Our phylogenetic analysis places it within Neovenatoridae, although the interrelationships within the family shows a polytomy. The size and general morphology of the maxilla are similar to those of Neovenator, but it shows some unique features (e.g., a series of shallow depressions, which become larger posteriorly, near the ventral edge; prominences on the ridged rim of the antorbital fossa; vertically-oriented ridges on the lateral surface; and large foramina at a dorsal edge of dental plates), indicative of a new taxon. The size of the maxilla is two folds of that of sympatric Timurlengia, suggesting this Uzbekistan neovenatorid is so far the largest predatory theropod in the Bissekty Formation. This study provides rare evidence of a large Neovenatoridae coexisting with a small tyrannosauroid in the Central Asia as seen in other areas (Europe and North America) in Laurasia and supports the hypothesis that tyrannosauroids were marginal predators until they achieved large body size. 

 

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