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truceburner

Ptiny Ptychodus ptooth

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truceburner

Recently I started looking a little more closely at the small gravels in the creek. This little Ptychodus tooth, the smallest I've found to date, is the fifth I've found in Austin. I've reviewed the pinned topic on Ptychodus, but can't nail down the ID from there.

post-7896-0-61113800-1456285610_thumb.jpgpost-7896-0-17958700-1456285611_thumb.jpgpost-7896-0-80234200-1456285611_thumb.jpgpost-7896-0-44057400-1456285612_thumb.jpg

What do you think?

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BobWill

Wow Ptruceburner, I'm not sure what to pthink :)

That's the smallest one I've seen though it makes sense they should come that small from juveniles. I'll let someone else help with the ID just couldn't help but add to the pun.

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PFOOLEY

I would lean ptowards P. Anonymus...but I have not seen mammillaris in hand.

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Ramo

I think I would go with P. anonymus as well. Those dang Ptychodus are second only to Squalicorax when it comes to difficulty in separating into species.

(As to the small end of the spectrum for ptychodus teeth, I have found numerous ones that are on the micro side, only a few mm wide.)

Ramo

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mechanic mike

I think I would go with P. anonymus as well. Those dang Ptychodus are second only to Squalicorax when it comes to difficulty in separating into species.

(As to the small end of the spectrum for ptychodus teeth, I have found numerous ones that are on the micro side, only a few mm wide.)

Ramo

Seems to be a lot of small ones in the green horn limestone of Kansas...I picked a lot of small ptychodus teeth out of the side of bluffs west of Pfeifer

Edited by mechanic mike

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Canadawest

Nice find. Makes me think. I also have never found a really small ptychodus tooth.

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Fruitbat

Here's another ptiny Ptychodus from the Eagle Ford of Dallas Co., Texas.

gallery_330_149_24644.jpg

-Joe

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Coelacanth

Here's another ptiny Ptychodus from the Eagle Ford of Dallas Co., Texas.

I think you mean Ptexas. :P

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BobWill

Are these pteeth asymmetrical enough to be from along the outer anterolateral or posterior rows where size is diminished?

Edited by BobWill

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siteseer

I think so.

Are these pteeth asymmetrical enough to be from along the outer anterolateral or posterior rows where size is diminished?

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truceburner

Thanks all. So far, P. anonymus seems most likely among the choices I've seen.

BobWill - Ptentially, but I'm not certain ;) Seems more toward the midline from my limited understanding, but I'm not familiar with the full dentition.

Here's another small Ptychodus tooth from my collection:

post-7896-0-53473000-1456376742_thumb.jpgpost-7896-0-15303000-1456376743_thumb.jpg

Edited by truceburner

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truceburner

Here's another very small ptychodus tooth from the Austin area, less than a cm in any dimension.

post-7896-0-75393500-1457502305_thumb.jpgpost-7896-0-91886300-1457502306_thumb.jpgpost-7896-0-40424700-1457502308_thumb.jpgpost-7896-0-09988800-1457502309_thumb.jpgpost-7896-0-79628400-1457502309_thumb.jpgpost-7896-0-45083500-1457502310_thumb.jpgpost-7896-0-67779500-1457503114_thumb.jpg

Any thoughts as to the species on this one? These can be found in the gravel bars, but not while standing, because that isn't close enough.

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LSCHNELLE

Shawn Hamm did not try to ID 70 smaller rice-sized (4 to 6 mm) Ptychodus I found in a pocket in a creek in Travis County.  This was due to the immaturity of the sharks.  They don't develop the adult characteristics until a certain size - maybe somewhere between 8 to 12 mm or larger. These smaller ones are too hard to ID correctly. 

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caldigger

Here is my contribution. Came off of a matrix plate from Blue Hill Shale of Kansas.

Only 3mm at its widest. Sorry, couldn't begin to ID the species.

20190211_183938.jpg

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erose

You get in the right layer and you'll find lots of them that are only a few millimeters across.

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