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judgesteve

Belemnite Battlefield and Possible Bone Saltwick Bay North Yorkshire

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judgesteve

Dear All

Last week whilst searching between Saltwick Bay and Hawkser I found three large slabs at the base of the cliff which had recently fallen into soft shale. These three were part of what I believe is a Belemnite Battlefield comprising Acrocoelites vulgarise and subtenius (I believe from my very limited knowledge and looking at my books). I also believe they fell from the Middle Lias/Alum Shale member. As you know I am new to this site and also very new at trying to adopt a more serious study and collection of fossils. This means I often post photos which turn out not to be what I had hoped after receiving the wisdom of other members.

My wife and I managed to recover two of the, very heavy, slabs and I began preparing one example (I am a novice at this too) to display at home. During my research I read some very interesting posts here regarding the theories behind the presence of battlefields and in particular Tarquin's thread concerning bite marks on Belemnites and stomach contents in reptiles/fish. This led me to examine the opposite side of the rock slabs in much closer detail and I found what I can only describe as 'skin' like impressions and other strange markings. Before I touch the other slab I thought I had better post some photographs in case I am damaging something which requires further investigation by a more knowledgeable individual. apologies if I am imagining things again and please do not think that I am trying to turn my greatest find and biggest sense of elation to date into something bigger. I am just looking for advice before I take a Dremel to the second slab.

Best Regards

Steve

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Darktooth

Well the belemites are pretty awesome! Can't believe how many there are! Sorry I can't help beyond that.

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Auspex

Pretty amazing specimens! Such plates are quite legendary.

I wonder whether the white encrustation might not be later mineral in-fill of a seam in the shale?

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judgesteve

Thank you for the information. When you suggest a larger photo can you suggest which parts and what you mean by larger please and i will do just that.

Steve

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judgesteve

Some larger photos

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judgesteve

More photos

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judgesteve

Last ones

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TqB

Thanks, Steve, great photos. There's nothing to worry about damaging there, it's inorganic nodule structure as I said before.

There is cone in cone calcite present and that's producing the weird surface texture in the second photos of posts 6 (top and far right hand side) & 7.

It's also visible as the fibrous section in the top left of the first photo, post no. 8.

Happy prepping!

Edited by TqB

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JohnBrewer

Absolutely stunning Steve!

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judgesteve

Thank you for all the comments. A couple more quick questions please:

Are my ID's correct and does anyone have any links to the theories behind the creation of Belemnites Battlefields in particular the catastrophic event theory. I've seen some very long seams ( 7 meters length and upto 4cm depth) at about 10ft height North of Runswick and it doesn't seem possible that these could be regurgitated. I'm getting quite fond of the Belemnites but struggling to find anything above basic level online.

Many thanks

Steve

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doushantuo
Auspex

Possibilities for these concentrations include lag deposits (where the heavy, resistant guards are swept of sediment by winnowing), post-breading mass mortality, or regurgitation by predators. Maybe even some of each.

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doushantuo
judgesteve

Brilliant many thanks the Mariotti paper is very interesting and I look forward to reading the others.

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Auspex

Auspex's "post breading" should of course read "post breeding".

I like my calamari breaded... :P

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TqB

Thank you for all the comments. A couple more quick questions please:

Are my ID's correct and does anyone have any links to the theories behind the creation of Belemnites Battlefields in particular the catastrophic event theory. I've seen some very long seams ( 7 meters length and upto 4cm depth) at about 10ft height North of Runswick and it doesn't seem possible that these could be regurgitated. I'm getting quite fond of the Belemnites but struggling to find anything above basic level online.

Many thanks

Steve

Yes, your IDs are correct apart from a couple of typos - it's Acrocoelites vulgaris and A. subtenuis.

Simpsonibelus dorsalis also occurs sometimes - I have one or two in my blocks but it can be hard to spot (a little stubbier than A. subtenuis and usually a bit club shaped, it also has a short alveolar groove which is a giveaway if it's showing).

I also have a 7" A. trisulculosus from it which hasn't been recorded before from that bed as far as I know so keep your eyes open!

Doyle's monograph, "The British Toarcian (Lower Jurassic) Belemnites" is the best modern guide although it could do with a bit of revision and expanding - that's true of just about all monographs though...

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