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tripwires

layers and possible age of layers in photo

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tripwires    0
tripwires

Completely new to fossils............can anyone tell me the aprox age the layers in this photo?

taken in central Alberta 2016

post-21676-0-68812200-1465524317_thumb.jpg

Edited by tripwires

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Canadawest    760
Canadawest

Central Alberta is north of Edmonton. That photo, because of the white spruce, looks more in the south like Dry island, Tollman or Horseshoe Canyon. You have to be specific to location as the exposures can be anywhere from about 60 to 80 million years old and any of a half dozen Late Cretaceous or Paleocene Formations.

Edited by Canadawest

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tripwires    0
tripwires

I was sure Edmonton was central, LOL new to the province, me bad

This area is slightly south ( half hour ) of Camrose, apparently it northern part of the "badlands"

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Canadawest    760
Canadawest

I don't know of any such areas a half hour south of Camrose. Could it be an hour south?

If so this is likely the Scollard Formation. The Scollard spans the KT boundary (the famous Dino extinction line). Most of the layers in the photo are Paleocene...the few bottom layers 'may' be Cretaceous.

One can't really tell from a photo. One needs to actually walk up the layers and identify them up close. Also, to make it more complicated, that general area has on and off layers from the Bearpaw Sea. These are marine layers and mess up any neatly stacked non-marine layers.

Anyways, if the lower layers are Cretaceous and if not 'marine', then they may have the latest Dino fossils before extinction ( T. rex, Triceratops, etc). In the upper layers no Dino but one can still find Crocodile, Turtle, etc. Small mammal teeth ( real small) in all non marine layers.

If you look in the layers and they seem sterile, don't get discouraged. You can look at 10 spots and zilch. Nothing. Then...aha! Look everywhere but in general the rusty rocky layers have the most fossils...these are ancient river deposits.

Edited by Canadawest

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tripwires    0
tripwires

Thanks Canadawest

I'll take close ups of the individual layers next weekend and post

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