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Is this fossil of bamboo


jeromebe

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I see many of these fossils where I live.

I was wondering if they are bamboo.

I read that Millions of years ago, it use to be tropic in Eastern Canada.

post-21773-0-81057100-1466430008_thumb.jpg

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These are most likely casts of feeding burrows. Do a search on the word ichnofossil and see if you find similar images to your finds.

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BTW, welcome to the forum. Looks like you have a great place to find some cool fossils. Looking forward to more interesting finds. :-)

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thanks Craig.

After searching what you told me, I stumbled on what I found.

It is Calamite fossils

If you search this, it will come up with identical type of fossils.

It was tree that would reach 100 feet or so.

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Very cool! I just realized I didn't click the image to get a clearer view showing the surface texture of the fossil.

Edited by CraigHyatt
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Just found one of those this weekend, but not as nice as yours. I had no clue what it was, just assumed it was some kind of plant. Fits right into the description (Carboniferous) as I found it in a place near Coal City, Indiana.

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I didn't know you were interested in the Proterozoic,Craig.

Edited by doushantuo
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I am too new to this to have a specialty, but it looks like the geology if NB covers the topics that I personally find the most intriguing: archaic life and origin of life, Cambrian explosion and novel life "experiments", and large scale extinction events and recoveries. If I ever get a chance to take courses, I'd like to study these areas. For now, I'll have to live vicariously through Jerome. :-)

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Thanks doushantuo. Right now I will focus on developing basic skills. Gotta crawl before I walk. ;-)

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Wow, is that a nice specimen. How long is it?

With a deposit like that, you should also be looking for the leaves, roots, and seeds of ancient plants. Get familiar with all the fossils that are common to the Pennsylvanian period fossils.

http://www.google.com/search?q=Pennsylvanian+period+fossils&btnG=Search&hl=en&gbv=1&tbm=isch

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Welcome to the forum. That is very nice for Calamites as tmaier said and also well preserved. These are so often found crushed flat but yours is 3D and so long.

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DPS Ammonite

What you have is the 3-D mold of sediment that filled in the hollow interior of a calamite. Some say that it had an easily rotted pith hence it is also called a pith cast. Think of the related hollow horsetail that could be preserved by filling the interior with sediment. The sediment hardens and the plant rots away leaving only the interior mold as a fossil.The exterior of the calamite is rarely preserved. However, yours might have some coalified stem wood left. Note the black material coating the interior mold especially on the left side. Also note the gap between the mold and the sediment on the top surface on the right side of the photo. That space probably held the coalified remains of the woody stem. Are you able to take a close photo of the possible coalified exterior (it also could be an iron rich mineral) of the calamite (or another one) which is rarely preserved? Does the black coating on the calamite seem to be coal, an iron rich mineral or something else?

Here's a good article about the fossil preservation of calamites: http://petrifiedwoodmuseum.org/PDF/AnatomyViney[1].doc.pdf

Edited by DPS Ammonite
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The black stuff on it seems to be harden tar.

the picture of this one was about 4 feet long.

unfortunately I am amateur and tried to chisel it out to quickly.

It broke in 4 pieces.

They are 3D. I will try to post more picture.

I read that they are around 300 - 500 million years old.

about 4 hours from where these were found, the oldest shark fossil was found.

it was found in Campbelton. it's 409 million year old.

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