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Marine Fossils of Central Alabama


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Rockin' Ric

Hello ya'll! Went on a fossil hunt trip last week with the APS group to a local area in central Alabama. Here are a few things I found... pretty excited to add these marine fossils to my collection!

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Some cleaned Echinoids and in situ

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Goblin shark tooth where I found it and pic of the two first shark teeth found ever!

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Present fish skeleton found on site, to bad it wasn't a fossilized one

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Fossildude19

Great finds, Ric!!

Glad to see you expanding your fossil horizons. ;)

Regards,

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Beautiful finds, I have never seen echinoids like these, where is there mouth located?

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sixgill pete

Very nice. Are the echinoids Hardouinia?

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attachicon.gifSkeleton.jpg

Present fish skeleton found on site, to bad it wasn't a fossilized one



Cover it up and give it a few million years. Edited by caldigger
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I bet I know where you went!

I think the echinoids are Hardouinia bassleri.

Don

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I bet I know where you went!

I think the echinoids are Hardouinia bassleri.

Don

The Tombigbee Sand Member of the Eutaw Formation continues giving.

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masonboro37

Great trip and finds!Thanks for sharing.

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Wrangellian

Pretty rich site there...

Any idea what stage of the Cret. that is, anybody?

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Late Santonian-Early Campanian

(Dicarinella concavata Interval zone*)

*foraminiferal zone

Brotzen,holotype:

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Edited by doushantuo
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Rockin' Ric

Pretty rich site there...

Any idea what stage of the Cret. that is, anybody?

Wrangellian, I think these fossils came from the Late Cretaceous period? I hope that is what u are asking...

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Rockin' Ric

Thanks everyone for the kind comments! Looking forward to adding other fossils to my collection soon.

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Wrangellian

Wrangellian, I think these fossils came from the Late Cretaceous period? I hope that is what u are asking...

That narrows it down, but looks like doushantuo narrowed it down even further (Thanks, both)

If it's Late Sant., it's pretty much exactly coeval with my local stuff!

Edited by Wrangellian
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That narrows it down, but looks like doushantuo narrowed it down even further (Thanks, both)

If it's Late Sant., it's pretty much exactly coeval with my local stuff!

Doushantuo is correct. The Tombigbee Sand Member of the Eutaw Formation lies within the Exogyra ponderosa zone which has been traditionally been placed within the Lower Campanian however most recent planktonic work places it within the Upper Santonian with the rest of the Eutaw Formation.

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If i remember correctly,there's also a sequence stratigraphic framework for the Alabama Cretaceous.

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  • 2 years later...

I’ve been browsing through your older posts to get a better idea of which fossils are found in the area. Along with crinoids, I’m hoping to find lots of echinoids once I start fossil hunting in Alabama. There’s something about them which I really like. :)

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  • 2 months later...
ALABAMAHEADHUNTER

 I do some fossil collecting here in Alabama , from nearly all of the state . Where and when does the APS meet ?

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On 6/23/2016 at 6:36 AM, MikeR said:

The Tombigbee Sand Member of the Eutaw Formation continues giving.

 

Hi Mike R.,

 

I have seen a lot of shark teeth from the Tombigbee Sand in Mississippi.  It was collected in the 60's and I haven't heard of people collecting there since so I wonder if it's restricted/outlawed somehow now.  Sometimes, sites are merely forgotten over time.

 

Jess

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2 hours ago, siteseer said:

 

Hi Mike R.,

 

I have seen a lot of shark teeth from the Tombigbee Sand in Mississippi.  It was collected in the 60's and I haven't heard of people collecting there since so I wonder if it's restricted/outlawed somehow now.  Sometimes, sites are merely forgotten over time.

 

Jess

 

Hi Jess

 

Do you know what county?  I have collected much more in Alabama and the site referenced above is a well known and easily accessible site.  One of the best Santonian sites in this part of the country was Plymouth Bluff on the Tombigbee River in Lowndes County, Mississippi.  Sometime during the 60s or 70s, the Army Corp of Engineers straightened the Tombigbee to form the TomTom Waterway for barge traffic.  The result was to isolate the river bend where Plymouth Bluff resided and in effect prevent the yearly flooding which kept the bluff clear of vegetation.

 

Mike

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