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willtexas07

Kope Fossils Northern Kentucky USA

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willtexas07

Found these fossils in Kenton County, Kentucky while there for a wedding. These are not like what I am used to in Texas, since they are roughly 300 million years older. Any help with fossil ID's is greatly appreciated!

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willtexas07

Part II

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willtexas07

Part III

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willtexas07

Part IV

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willtexas07

Part V

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willtexas07

Part VI

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willtexas07

Part VII

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JohnBrewer

Nice hash plates, love the first one especially. The first one is covered with crinoids seen from the ends. They're the round things, some of which have the star shape inside. The branch looking things are bryozoans http://www.isgs.illinois.edu/outreach/geology-resources/bryozoans and you've got some brachiopods there. Nice haul.

Edited by JohnBrewer

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CraigHyatt

"hash plate"... learned a new term today, thanks!

Back home we call it "calabash" at the NC beaches. ;-)

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JohnBrewer

"hash plate"... learned a new term today, thanks!

Back home we call it "calabash" at the NC beaches. ;-)

Or mass mortality plate :)

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prem

I see lots of dead things:

- lots of crinoid segments

- lots of brachiopods of various genera/species

- lots of bryozoans

- lots of trilobite bits of Flexicalymene and Isotelus (including what looks like an Isotelus pygidium)
- lots of Cryptolithus trilobite 'lace collars'

---Prem

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prem

I bet if you examined under a microscope, you would find pieces of Acidaspis trilobites as well - free cheeks and pygidia.

---Prem

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howard_l

The most common brachiopod in that area is Platystrophia, so I am sure some of them are those. The more flat shaped ones could be Rafinesquina.

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prem

By the way, the Dry Dredgers website is a very good place to identify lots of Cincinnatian fossils:

http://drydredgers.org/

---Prem

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willtexas07

This thread is exactly why I believe this website represents the positive side of the internet. I grab a bunch of interesting rocks and people from all over the world share their insight and resources, openning my eyes to a fantastic planet from 450 million years ago. Many thank to all who replied and all who viewed this post!

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prem

oops...forgot to mention the very last two pix are rugose coral cross-sections.

---Prem

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erose

oops...forgot to mention the very last two pix are rugose coral cross-sections.

---Prem

Actually they are bryozoa. Great example of how scale can fool you. the specimens are smaller than you think.

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prem

Actually they are bryozoa. Great example of how scale can fool you. the specimens are smaller than you think.

Ah, I see now.

---Prem

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dalmayshun

congratulations...beautiful pieces, for me hashplates are wonderful little worlds contained in an easily transported piece of rock...though the last time I collected some near Green Bay, Wis. I felt more like a miner, carrying at least 80 # in my backpack as I made it back through the stream to my car...It is great to look at them with a magnifier...the complexity is astounding.

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