Jump to content
ModernJames

Shark tooth in Lake Michigan

Recommended Posts

ModernJames

Hey everyone! I was exploring a private beach next to a graveyard in Petoskey, Mi. I mostly found regular Petoskey stones but I ran across afew things I found unusual. [1st & 2nd picture] I'm almost positive this is a shark tooth. [4th picture] the dark stone I'm also unsure of. Let me know what you guys think! Thank you so much.

James Carden

15yirnb.jpg

Here's another look at the same stone dry:

23m0in5.jpg

9fpdhl.jpg

b4azrn.jpg

Larger picture of everything I found:

2412d8k.jpg

Edited by ModernJames

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ynot

Welcome to TFF!

It would help if You could single out the pieces in question and provide pictures of it with a scale.

I do not see a shark tooth. I do see shell fragments and corals. possibly some bryozoan.

Tony

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fossilized6s

welcome. your first stone looks like a section of rugose coral that has worn into a shape resembling a shark tooth.

your next one looks like a type of coral. I'm not sure which, someone will though.

Edited by fossilized6s

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Troodon

Welcome to the forum. Agree with the others do not see any shark teeth but corals and stones

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Herb

I see only corals at different angles, an oblique coral section on the large stone in the first picture does look somewhat like a tooth though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ModernJames

Updated afew pictures and added a quarter for scale. I'm sure that should help identify.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
digit

Agreed with the others that the "shark tooth" is an oblique cross section of a large solitary coral polyp. Do some searches on this forum (or Google image searches) for "rugose coral" or "horn coral" and you'll see examples that will make your find make sense.

Petoskey Stones are on my bucket list of things I'd love to go hunting for so thanks for reminding me of these beautiful rounded corals from 350 million years ago. That just bumping them up several places on my bucket list.

Cheers.

-Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fossildude19

Nice corals!

Some of those might polish up nicely.
Regards,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TqB

The black one looks like a tabulate coral, something like this Cladopora from Michigan (which I bought...).

post-4556-0-34536400-1467807658_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
digit

Next time I'm up in Chicago I need to make a roadtrip north to Petoskey and pick up some fodder for my rock tumbler. Looks like many of the Petoskey Stoned come pre-rounded and only need a tad more tumble-shaping before going on to the polishing stages.

Tarquin, I think you likely meant Cladocora (a genus of coral still around today). It forms clusters of small individual tubes that in your specimen looks like it was infilled with some black matrix providing a wonderful contrast in the cut and polished slab.

Cheers.

-Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TqB

Next time I'm up in Chicago I need to make a roadtrip north to Petoskey and pick up some fodder for my rock tumbler. Looks like many of the Petoskey Stoned come pre-rounded and only need a tad more tumble-shaping before going on to the polishing stages.

Tarquin, I think you likely meant Cladocora (a genus of coral still around today). It forms clusters of small individual tubes that in your specimen looks like it was infilled with some black matrix providing a wonderful contrast in the cut and polished slab.

Cheers.

-Ken

Hi Ken - Cladopora is a Silurian to Devonian tabulate genus, "ramose with slender to cylindrical branches" (Treatise). The spellings are very close, and Google also wants me to look at Cladophora which is an alga. :)

Edited by TqB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
digit

I'm well familiar with Cladophora (the algae) as it is way too common on many coral reefs these days. :(

I'll have to research Cladopora more. Unfortunately, internet searches tend to "auto correct" to more common search terms and finding information on Silurian/Devonian corals is likely getting buried in the clutter. Thanks for the lead--I always enjoy opportunities for learning about something I'd never heard of before.

Cheers.

-Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
FossilDiva#1

If that was a sharktooth from Michigan, it would be super rare! Lol  Definitely not a tooth , but kool fossils anyway.  The shape does look a little like a hemipristis (snaggle tooth) shark tooth . 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×