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The Amateur Paleontologist

Møns Klint Fossil Excavations (MKFE)

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The Amateur Paleontologist

Why Møns Klint may have a dinosaur

 

-Many dinosaur fossils have been found in marine deposits

 

-There are two records of dinosaurs from the chalk of England, which is somewhat similar to that of Møns Klint

 

-Maastrichtian dinosaur fossils have been found in marine deposits

 

-Dinosaur fossils have been found in Maastrichtian limestone/chalk

 

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jpc

It is certainly possible... other late Cretaceous marine beds have produced dino remains.  Kansas chalk...two or three hadrosaur verts and maybe one or two more complete specimen of Niobrarasaurus (I think one of our KS members actually found one of these) and I think an ankylosaur, Australian marine ankylosaurs Minmi and Kunbarrasaurus, Pierre Shale in my neck of the woods I think has produced the occasional hadrosaur vert.  (Feel free to correct my list made mostly off the top of my head).  

 

But these are exceedingly rare.    

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The Amateur Paleontologist

To add to your list of dinosaur fossils from Cretaceous marine sediments, there are several hadrosaurid remains in the Maastrichtian limestone of Maastricht; there is also a euornithopod tooth and skeletal remains of the ankylosaur Acanthopholis from the chalk of England. From the "Blue Marls" of Provence, there are partial abelisaurid skeletons. In southern Australia, there are several opalised bones belonging to theropods and ornithopods. Furthermore, from the Bearpaw Shale of Alberta has been recovered a fairly complete nodosaur skeleton, and several other ornithischian remains.

There is also a nodosaurid ankylosaur from coastal California. 

John Horner, in 1979, reported the presence of 95 dinosaur specimens in the late Cretaceous of USA. I am fairly sure that that number of specimens has increased since '79.

By the way, I only listed above a handful of countries, I am sure there are many more dinosaur specimens than I wrote about.

Thus, they are not as "exceedingly rare" as you suggest.

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The Amateur Paleontologist

MKFE News and Updates

 

 

 

Preparation:

-2 out of the 4 cidarid spines have been reglued

-Small but well preserved fragment of Membranipora is entirely freed of chalk

 

 

 

Research:

-Various circumstances (shown in an earlier post) point to the fact that the presence of dinosaur bones at MK is possible

-Based on correlative studies with similar fossil sites, MK likely harbours the remains of elasmosaurid plesiosaurs and chelonioid testudines

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Dsailor

Thank you for the excellent work you are doing. Sounds awesome.

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The Amateur Paleontologist
8 hours ago, Dsailor said:

Thank you for the excellent work you are doing. Sounds awesome.

Thank you for your support! Expect a paper or two in a popular geology review within the next few years... 

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The Amateur Paleontologist

Various notes on the fossil site of Møns Klint

 

 

-Location: Island of Møn, Storstrøms County, Zealand, Denmark. 

 

-Age: Upper part of Lower Maastrichtian  (~70 million years old), Late Cretaceous

     -->Stratigraphy: Esnehensis Zone, Tor            Formation, Højerup Member, Chalk            Group.

 

-Sediment exposed: stratified layers of pure (>99% CaCO3) chalk, with regular bands of flint

 

-Origin: marine

 

-Length of fossil site: 6 kilometres

 

-Highest point of fossil site:126 metres

 

-Fauna: Sponges, Bryozoans, Corals, Brachiopods, Lamellibranches, Bivalves, Gasteropods, Cirripedes, Decapods, Coleoids, Ammonoids, Nautiloids, Crinoids, Echinoids, Asteroids, Ophiuroids, Holothuroids, Chondrichthyans, Osteichthyans, Reptiles.

 

-Most similar fossil site: Jasmund Peninsula cliffs, Rügen (Germany).

 

-Rarest invertebrate fossil: onychite from a large teuthid

 

-Rarest vertebrate fossil: fragments of the mandibular rami from a Thoracosaurus-like gavialoid.

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The Amateur Paleontologist

MKFE News and Updates

 

 

Bad news:

-Field trip to Møns Klint was not possible this summer due to various personal reasons, though I will do my best to make one possible for summer 2018.

 

 

Research:

-Currently cataloguing and labelling Møns Klint fossils from MKFE N¤ 1

-Writing a brief communication describing a unique fossil from MK (a pair of worn thoracosaurine mandibulae.

 

 

"Breaking news":

-Change in project name: it is now called the Møns Klint Fossil Research Program (MKFRP) - the acronym MKFE now represents only the field trips.

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Macrophyseter
On 9/30/2017 at 4:41 AM, The Amateur Paleontologist said:

-Field trip to Møns Klint was not possible this summer due to various personal reasons, though I will do my best to make one possible for summer 2018.

RIP :faint: But hopefully next summer will fare better than other summers! Good luck!

 

Also, maybe could a few pics be okay? I'm dying to see what youve got with my own eyes :popcorn:

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The Amateur Paleontologist

Don't worry, I will try and post a few pictures of my finds during the weekend.

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UtahFossilHunter
On 10/5/2017 at 5:56 AM, The Amateur Paleontologist said:

Don't worry, I will try and post a few pictures of my finds during the weekend.

Got any pictures yet?

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