Jump to content

Recommended Posts

 

 

Soooo under the pretence of a holiday in the South West of England I took Dr B and little Violet to Lyme Regis and we, er, stumbled across Lyme Regis Museum which unbeknown to me had some paleontological specimens inside

 

:P something to do with a certain Mary Anning I believe.

 

Fortunately the museum has other things that Dr B was interested in (actually we all were), as a teacher of creative writing and a novelist, so my bacon was saved when it became apparent that John Fowles was curator there for two years and Jane Austin visited Lyme regularly.

 

The museum is really kid friendly an there are questionnaires for children of all ages to do with a small prize of a polished piece of semi precious stone.

 

Lots of images to follow :)

 

Pencil in hand Violet is ready to start her questionnaire.

 

 

File 27-08-2016, 10 12 58 pm.jpeg

  • I found this Informative 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
Now this is supercool. William Buckland, the famous 19th century had a table made from coprolite, (I bet Lori would like one of these!). This is a replica made by jonathan Matthews a local cabinetmaker with the coprolite inlay panel made by Beth Werrett of Wiltshire Conservation in 2013. Fossil poo, every kids favourite.
 
 

 

 

File 27-08-2016, 10 14 05 pm.jpeg

  • I found this Informative 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Violet working through the questions, and some were quite challenging, well to me :blink:

File 31-08-2016, 6 51 37 pm.jpeg

  • I found this Informative 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

My favourite beast is the ichthyosaur. The museum had the biggest head I've ever seen in any UK museum, this was a real monster.

 
 

File 27-08-2016, 10 15 46 pm.jpeg

  • I found this Informative 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a Temnodontosaurus platyodon, the largest found locally. It was found in 2008 by a local collector, Mike Harrison. This would have measured around seven metres. Mounted by the engineering team at the Natural History Museum, London. An average sized ichthyosaur was one and two metres.

 

 

File 27-08-2016, 10 17 02 pm.jpeg

  • I found this Informative 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you notice the little fella? No? His name is Stuart :D

File 27-08-2016, 10 19 24 pm.jpeg

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a puppet of Mary Anning made by Laura Heit for her video 'The Amazing Mysterious & True Story of Mary Anning and her Monsters'. It's on YouTube. 

 

 

File 27-08-2016, 11 35 15 pm.jpeg

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Upper jaw of a pterosaurid found locally. I want one of these!

 

 

File 27-08-2016, 10 21 07 pm.jpeg

  • I found this Informative 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

William Buckland, amazing 19th century paleontologist looked like this apparently :) 

 

 

File 27-08-2016, 10 31 44 pm.jpeg

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

IT was a real privilege to see some of Anning's original notebooks. It's important that some of these remain in the museum near where she worked rather than hidden in an archive at the Natural History Museum in London. 

 

A little Anning history. 

 

Anning (1799-1847) was a pioneering amateur paleontologist who gained worldwide fame for some of the most important discoveries of her time in the country of Dorset, Southern England. She became an acknowledged expert on coprolites. With her brother she found the first complete ichthyosaur in 1810/11, a complete plesiosaur in 1823 and then parts of a pterosaurid in 1828. 

 

Anning died of breast cancer aged 47. She gained recognition for her work in the scientific community. Not bad for someone the wrong gender (women weren't taken seriously in the scientific community), the wrong class (her parents were poor) and the wrong religion, (not creationist). 

 

Her death, in 1847, was recorded by the Geological Society who didn't admit women until 1904 (!) and her life commemorated by a stained glass window in St Michael's Parish church in Lyme. Next time in Lyme I'll find the church and photograph the window. 

 

An an amazing woman, do Google her. 

 

 

File 27-08-2016, 11 56 49 pm.jpeg

  • I found this Informative 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally another ichthyosaur. 

 

This is museum is very child friendly. Having said that it's a museum that will appeal to the most serious paleontologist too. There are many other exhibits there which relate to the area. The tickets are a bargain price, will last a month so you can go back and under 16's are free. You can't say that about many museums in the UK. 

 

A special cheer for @JohnJ who managed to recover most of this post from a Google cache after the original evaporated in to the ether during the forum upgrade. I originally wrote this on my iPad and it took over an hour. John, you're a diamond, thank you!  :1-SlapHands_zpsbb015b76:

 

 

File 28-08-2016, 12 04 12 am.jpeg

  • I found this Informative 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the guided tour, John. Love to get there someday.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like a very cool place.  I regret not visiting the few times I was in the area.  Thanks for the tour.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Great presentation, John.  Glad I could help. :1-SlapHands_zpsbb015b76:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the virtual tour.. I have heard about Lyme Regis since I was in Grade 6 or 7 when my teacher Mt Kitt (same guy for both grades) who I think was from Devon originally, showed me an ammo from there and told me about about the place. (Also recall reading about Mary Anning around that time, when first getting interested in fossils and reading the guidebooks from the school library and that my parents bought for me and brother - some of the first stuff you learn, I guess)

Link to post
Share on other sites
Barerootbonsai

Great tour made me think a visit is a must.  Loved the bit for everyone and how it is presented. Cool report.

Link to post
Share on other sites

That first fish is amazing! And the rest! Love the puppets the most though :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am with troodon.. I have been to Lyme a few times, but have not made it into this museum.  But there will be a next time.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
Dave (POM) Allen

this museum and my trip to lyme regis 45 years ago is what first started my interest in fossils :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...