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LandonM

My new find.

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LandonM

My new find,not sure age or name though. Still learning I have more pictures

image.jpeg

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njfossilhunter

Very cool finds......:)

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Stingray

Reminds me of the ones I found in York River Virginia.... Nice find

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fossiling

huge pectinid! nice gastropods on the reverse side!:envy:

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jhw

Guessing these are 2 different pieces? Top photo, as said, Pecten shell (scallop) Big one too. Lower shot, Turritella snail. If it was mine, I'd extract the snail and see what's inside the rest of the rock. Location found would help with age, but look similar to Miocene finds we have here in So. Cal.

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LandonM

New find! I am excited about this one, Although don't know the name, shiny like abalone, any help? 

IMG_1959.JPG

IMG_1960.JPG

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doushantuo

NICE!!!!

Initially,I though the last one was a pectinid as well.

I feel not qualified enough/my molluscan assessments tend to be way off:D

Chlamys,Amusium?

The absence of ears ,don't know the significance of that,might be simple taphonomy

The hinge line would be the most informative

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fossiling

it dosen't look like the abalones I eat at chinese restauraunts to me.

looks like another pectinid to me.

p.s. no offence

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tmaier

This last one you posted is an oyster. The thickness and roughness of the shell and the structure of the hinge are some clues. When you have new specimens to present, you should start a new thread. Otherwise the context of the threads becomes muddled and hard to read.

The first one is a very large and flat scallop (pectinid). There is a spring here in Florida that have fossils likely to be in the same genus as the one shown here. They are huge, and stacked up like large dinner plates. I don't know the age of that formation, and I'm afraid to give away the location of the fossils, because people might try to take them (they are in a state park). Our formation is definately post Eocene.

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