Nimravis

Sharktooth Hill Micro Matrix

40 posts in this topic

9 hours ago, Nimravis said:

Posted pics.

Thanks Nim. I'm sure many will appreciate this. I was about to purchase a 16 mp zoom camera for inspecting circuit pathways that is considerably more expensive. I may have to reevaluate my plans. 

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33 minutes ago, Raggedy Man said:

Thanks Nim. I'm sure many will appreciate this. I was about to purchase a 16 mp zoom camera for inspecting circuit pathways that is considerably more expensive. I may have to reevaluate my plans. 

It's worth a try, prior to spending big bucks- and I could have taken closer pics, but wanted to be consistent with the images.

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So can We see some more pictures of the things You found?

Did You find any heterodontus teeth?

 

Tony

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I too have used a "digital microscope" to take photos of some of my micros. Basically it is a "web cam" with some optics stacked in front of the sensor to give a much higher resolution than would be needed for web cam use. The one I purchased was a bit more but honestly I think the extra cost just went to a more expensive stand with a little thumb wheel that you can use to micro-adjust the height to the object being photographed. Here's the setup I bought:

 

http://www.celestron.com/browse-shop/microscopes/digital-microscopes/handheld-digital-microscope-pro

 

I'd think that for circuit pathway inspection that a less expensive setup like the one Niravis purchased would work well (as you'd likely be hand-holding the digital scope as the base stand that comes with these models does not allow you to fit any wide object (like a large circuit board under the scope). In fact, I wanted to be able to lay out and stage multiple micros for photography (on a suitable piece of gray construction paper for a neutral background--good for color balancing) so I built myself a PVC stand. I'll have to go dig that out and take photos in case anybody else is interested in a similar setup.

 

In the end I was happy with the magnification from the digital scope but found the extremely limited depth of field to be problematic. There is no way of "stopping down" the lens on the camera to increase the portion of the micro-fossil that is in focus. DOF becomes a real issue when doing micro-photography and there are several ways of dealing with it. Using a more expensive macro lens for a DSLR camera will allow you to flood the subject with light and stop the lens down to its smallest aperture (f/22 or f/32) to maximize the optics to gain the most DOF possible. There is another alternative though it takes a bit more time and effort to achieve surreal depths of field--software!

 

I had learned from Auspex of the existence of a really nice software package called Helicon Focus.

 

http://www.heliconsoft.com/heliconsoft-products/helicon-focus/

 

There are free focus stacking software packages out there and I believe the ability to combine multiple images in some of the later versions of Photoshop exists as well but Helicon Focus works like magic. You simply take a series of photos with a slightly different focal point on your micro-subject and then let the software detect which parts of each image show the best focus. These pieces are then combined to form a single output image that contains the best parts of the series of photos you feed it as input. After some time playing around with my DSLR rig (and the macro lens I bought specifically for playing with micro fossil photography) I ended up using the Helicon Remote which allows the software to control the lens focus point by connecting your camera to your computer with a USB cable. This allows the software to move your lens focus by very precise amounts to automatically shoot a series of images. It's pretty fun to setup and watch your camera and computer work together to take a series of images and composite them into a stunning high DOF image.

 

Of course, macro lenses for DSLR cameras and special software do not come cheap but for those who enjoy photography and who strive to make all of the details on their fossils as sharp as possible, it is an excellent means to an end.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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1 hour ago, ynot said:

So can We see some more pictures of the things You found?

Did You find any heterodontus teeth?

 

Tony

Tony- I probably did, and by looking at pics on the FF, I may have them mixed in with Ray teeth.

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On 9/26/2016 at 8:25 AM, ynot said:

So can We see some more pictures of the things You found?

Did You find any heterodontus teeth?

 

Tony

Tony,

I did find one Heterodontus tooth.

 

S20160927_0001.jpg

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Nice one! Are the colors true to the picture?

 

Tony

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4 hours ago, ynot said:

Nice one! Are the colors true to the picture?

 

Tony

Yes they are. I started going through the matrix again and am getting the fossils that I left behind. LOL

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1 minute ago, Nimravis said:

Yes they are. I started going through the matrix again and am getting the fossils that I left behind. LOL

That is a neat pattern!:meg::wub:  Have You found any anterior heterodontus teeth? (I like this species because of the drastic difference between anterior and lateral teeth.)

 

Tony

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Just now, ynot said:

That is a neat pattern!:meg::wub:  Have You found any anterior heterodontus teeth? (I like this species because of the drastic difference between anterior and lateral teeth.)

 

Tony

Not that I know of, I have been looking at pics that I believe you posted and others. I have found so many fossils in this matrix that it is unbelievable. I really have to look closely at the hundreds of ray teeth that I have and see if I have any. I will keep you posted and if I have a question I will send you a pic. Please look at these 2 pics and tell me what you think. The first one, I cannot find right now, I dropped it when I was putting it back in a container.

 

S20160926_0011.jpgS20160926_0020.jpg

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I think that they are cetorhinus (basking shark) gill rakes.

Maybe @Al Dente can confirm this.

 

Tony

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I think there is a good chance the first one is a Cetorhinus gill raker. I don't think the second one is.

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On Sunday, September 25, 2016 at 11:52 PM, Nimravis said:

(+25) Misc. Fish Teeth ??

 

S20160924_0050.jpg

more or less what i found in okinawa.

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Look like sparidae teeth (fish).

 

Coco

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Yup. Or possibly sciaenidae (drum) teeth. I don't know how you'd tell one from the other with an isolated "button" tooth. Several families of invertivores use these pharyngeal "throat" teeth to crush the hard shells of their prey items (crustaceans, molluscs, etc.).

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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