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Troodon

Identification of Troodonitids Teeth

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Raggedy Man

My what big teeth you have Troodon...:D

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Susan from PA

Great googly moogly!    They can certainly be confusing!   Yet another reason to purchase a scope for my computer!   Thanks so much fo sharing! :).  

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Canadawest

Taxonomy is only as confusing as the latest article.  

 

What matters is what always matters... there is a particular specimen and it was collected at a specific locality.  Everything else is subject to revision ( the very nature of science). Thus why a specimen without collecting info loses its scientific value.

 

Identifying a specimen to genus is worthwhile but also just fun. I'm going to have to get out some of my troodon teeth and try and figure them out. One of things I like about member Troodon's postings on dinos is that he brings info from a few sources together and this gives better perspective.

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Troodon
On 10/3/2016 at 5:36 PM, Canadawest said:

Taxonomy is only as confusing as the latest article.  

 

What matters is what always matters... there is a particular specimen and it was collected at a specific locality.  Everything else is subject to revision ( the very nature of science). Thus why a specimen without collecting info loses its scientific value.

 

Identifying a specimen to genus is worthwhile but also just fun. I'm going to have to get out some of my troodon teeth and try and figure them out. One of things I like about member Troodon's postings on dinos is that he brings info from a few sources together and this gives better perspective.

 

Thanks, be glad to assist with any ID 

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Troodon

Here is an example of a tooth "cf Alaska" but from Alberta 13mm long

20161003_041648.jpg

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Troodon

The initial post has been updated to reflect the latest understanding of this poorly understood group of dinosaurs and the consideration that Troodon formosus is no longer a valid taxon.   

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LordTrilobite

Such a shame too, Troodon was a nice name.

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Troodon
18 hours ago, LordTrilobite said:

Such a shame too, Troodon was a nice name.

:) ha ha

Also easier to pronounce and spell

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Troodon

I noticed that some papers continue to use Troodon formosus as a valid taxon.  One paper gave the following explanation which I've seen stated before in other similar circumstances: 

 

"The species  Troodon  formosus, Leidy 1856, was originally established on a tooth from the Campanian Judith  River Formation of Montana.  In  1987,  Currie  revised  the  taxon  and  synonymized  several subsequently named species into T.  formosus.  In 2017 van der Reest and Currie recognized that  T.  formosus as defined by Currie included two taxa, one of which they named  Latenivenatrix mcmasterae  and  the  other they referred to  Stenonychosaurus  inequalis. Given that the latter had already been synonymized into the senior T. formosus and remained unused for 30 years,  Troodon  formosus  remains the proper name for this taxon, exclusive of  L.  mcmasterae, and we continue to use it here."

 

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-30085-6

 

Not sure others authors will follow this path especially with Dinosaur Park material.

 

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