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Scttrthm

Bison tooth?

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Scttrthm

Found this tooth today in northern Brown County in Nebraska.  Fully mineralized along a steam bank that was eroded by heavy rains this summer.  Found in a gravel layer about 8 feet below ground level

IMG_20161020_214831.jpg

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FossilDudeCO

I would say bison is a good guess.

I am on my phone and have recently discovered it doesn't give me the best views, but it looks a bit narrow to be horse.

Any other info you can give us?

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Scttrthm

Thanks for the comment.  I really don't know anything more.  This area is fossil rich but this is the first tooth I ever found 

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FossilDudeCO

I know a lot of Nebraska has White River formation, it is possible this tooth could be older than you think.

However...MOST of the White River formation teeth I have seen have a dark creamy colour. This seems more recent due to the lighter tones I see.

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Scttrthm

The creek I found it on is a tributary of the Niobrara River

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Harry Pristis

Oh, it's bovid alright.  It appears to me to be a deciduous tooth.

The question is whether it is from a bison or a cow.  Strictly a

guess, but I think it's from a cow.

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Ash

Why do you say that?

 

The OP thinks it's fully mineralized so would presumably, if that is the case, be older than cow. (Unless you don't mean domestic cow?)

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Scttrthm

I really appreciate all your discussions about this tooth.  I did last night take this fossil to the daughter of Morris Skinner as she is a friend.  She did identify it as a Pleistocene fossil but told me she was hesitant to say bison as her father never found a bison tooth here.

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Harry Pristis
7 hours ago, Ash said:

Why do you say that?

 

The OP thinks it's fully mineralized so would presumably, if that is the case, be older than cow. (Unless you don't mean domestic cow?)

 

Well, notice that the tooth enamel is scrubbed of cementum, polished no doubt by stream tumbling.  The remaining enamel is a durable and stable mineral, so "fully mineralized" is meaningless.  The unaltered enamel could be ten years old or ten thousand; but, the gracile condition of the isolated stylid suggests to me a modern cow, a Bos calf.

 

If the friend can identify the tooth as a Pleistocene fossil, the tooth MUST BE from a bison.  If the tooth is from a cow, it MUST BE recent.  And, it must be one or the other.

 

 

bisonteethocclusalstylid.JPG

cow_cheekteeth.JPG

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Scttrthm

Again thank you so much for all of your comments and insights.  It is a fossilized tooth and I wish it could talk to me and tell me it's journey.  I suppose in a way it can, I am just not smart enough to listen

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