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Raptor Lover

Finally got a nice raptor tooth

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Raptor Lover

So since I started collecting fossils, I've been trying to get a nice complete raptor tooth. I bought my first dinosaur teeth (Moroccan theropod tooth and 2 partial raptor from Hell Creek) back in May 2015. Last week, I finally found and bought a beautiful little raptor tooth from Hell Creek :) Here it is :yay-smiley-1:

CM161119-16381301.jpg

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Raptor Lover

CM161119-16382802.jpg

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StevenJD

nice tooth, thanks for showing us!

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ynot

Sweet piece!! Congratulations on the acquisition.

Tony

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-Andy-

Gratz! A fossil worth your name!

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Ludwigia

Congratulations! You must be very happy!

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sandgroper

What a great tooth, well done mate!

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LordTrilobite

Very nice!

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Runner64

Very nice tooth! Your collection is growing quite a bit. Keep up the work!

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MR.CRINOID

How did you ID it?

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Darktooth

Nice find! Congrats!:trex:

Quote

 

 

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Vieira

Nice tooth. :)

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Runner64
20 hours ago, MR.CRINOID said:

How did you ID it?

Too small and is not fat enough to be a tyrannosaur tooth. Also, it's too recurved for a tyrannosaur.

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caldigger

What other small raptors are known from the Hell Creek deposit that would match the one he has? Obviously Tyrannosaurs weren't breed in toy form, so what other suggestions might you have?

5 hours ago, Runner64 said:

Too small and is not fat enough to be a tyrannosaur tooth. Also, it's too recurved for a tyrannosaur.

 

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Canadawest

T rex is thought to have been the size of an adult cat when it hatched.  I have what 'may be' Tyrannosaurid teeth that small.  However, isolated teeth are difficult to ID.  Also the position of the tooth varies with position.  I dont think there is a jaw specimen with intact  teeth of a youngest tyrannosaur (I could be wrong).

 

In general I find smaller Tyrannosaur teeth to be more robust than same size raptor teeth.  However, sometimes we compare to previously tentatively identified teeth and mistaken identity perpetuates itself. In the Campanian Cretaceous,  it can get iffy trying to to distinguish small Tyrannosaur and big Dromaeosaur teeth.

 

Anyways, a nice tooth. A bit easier to ID in the Maastrichtian deposits.  It has the gracile shape of a raptor. The tooth has nice serrations and has the best type of tip...intact but showing wear from real life.  One wonders what the little guy sunk his tooth into. 

 

 

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LordTrilobite

Raptor teeth are also identifiable by the serrations. The serrations on the back curve are generally larger than those on the front. And raptor teeth are indeed also recurved.

 

It might even be possible to identify the raptor teeth to the species level by looking at the serrations more closely. Shape and number of serrations differ between species. There are also only two known raptors/dromaeosaurids present in the Hell Creek formation. Dakotaraptor and Acheroraptor. The latter being the smaller one.

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Raptor Lover
14 hours ago, Canadawest said:

T rex is thought to have been the size of an adult cat when it hatched.  I have what 'may be' Tyrannosaurid teeth that small.  However, isolated teeth are difficult to ID.  Also the position of the tooth varies with position.  I dont think there is a jaw specimen with intact  teeth of a youngest tyrannosaur (I could be wrong).

 

In general I find smaller Tyrannosaur teeth to be more robust than same size raptor teeth.  However, sometimes we compare to previously tentatively identified teeth and mistaken identity perpetuates itself. In the Campanian Cretaceous,  it can get iffy trying to to distinguish small Tyrannosaur and big Dromaeosaur teeth.

 

Anyways, a nice tooth. A bit easier to ID in the Maastrichtian deposits.  It has the gracile shape of a raptor. The tooth has nice serrations and has the best type of tip...intact but showing wear from real life.  One wonders what the little guy sunk his tooth into. 

 

 

Well said! And thank you :)

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Raptor Lover
13 hours ago, LordTrilobite said:

Raptor teeth are also identifiable by the serrations. The serrations on the back curve are generally larger than those on the front. And raptor teeth are indeed also recurved.

 

It might even be possible to identify the raptor teeth to the species level by looking at the serrations more closely. Shape and number of serrations differ between species. There are also only two known raptors/dromaeosaurids present in the Hell Creek formation. Dakotaraptor and Acheroraptor. The latter being the smaller one.

Yep very true :P

Hmm I didn't know the serrations differ between species, thanks for the info. 

 

Yeah the seller labeled it as Saurornitholestes but I knew that Acheroraptor is the only small dromaeosaur described in Hell Creek 

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