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Lower Jurassic damselfly Protomyrmeleon brunonis from Charmouth


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First record of the Lower Jurassic damselfly Protomyrmeleon brunonis Geinitz, 1887 from Charmouth, UK donated to "Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde Stuttgart".

Three wings super-imposed, without body. So far only known from Dobbertin in Mecklenburg, Germany.


F. E. Geinitz (1887): Beitrag zur Geologie Mecklenburgs. Archiv des Vereins der Freunde der Naturgeschichte in Mecklenburg 41:143-216

 

Protomyrmeleon.jpg

 

Edited by oilshale
damselfly not ant-fly
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I found these dragonfly wings in the 80ties on my way back home from a conference in Edinburgh (just a slight detour of 200 miles..).  It was already too late and there was only half an hour left till sunset. This was on the first slab I looked at.
Thomas

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7 minutes ago, oilshale said:

I found these dragonfly wings in the 80ties on my way back home from a conference in Edinburgh (just a slight detour of 200 miles..).  It was already too late and there was only half an hour left till sunset. This was on the first slab I looked at.
Thomas

As most of us know, half of fossil hunting is pure luck. Haha! 

 

Great find! 

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Wow, that's nice!
 " It was already too late and there was only half an hour left till sunset. " - that's the right timing... :)

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6 hours ago, oilshale said:

I found these dragonfly wings in the 80ties on my way back home from a conference in Edinburgh (just a slight detour of 200 miles..).  It was already too late and there was only half an hour left till sunset. This was on the first slab I looked at.
Thomas

 

I find the angle of light can make a huge difference finding specimens in northern latitudes. Sometimes a negative but often a plus.

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On ‎02‎.‎12‎.‎2016 at 0:50 AM, Canadawest said:

 

I find the angle of light can make a huge difference finding specimens in northern latitudes. Sometimes a negative but often a plus.

 

Definitely! Can make a huge difference and as you said, can be either negative or positive.

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