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Jesuslover340

Show Us Your Croc, Gator, and Turtle Material!

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Ash

Beautiful tooth, another for me to look up :)

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siteseer
14 hours ago, Jesuslover340 said:

Nor have I, but I have seen the publication quoted in other publications as a reference. I've shown some professionals the 'artifacts'; some say they are artifacts, others say they're not. But it's not my area of expertise. Looking at geological maps of Oklahoma, however, does indicate the general area to be Pliocene in age.

 

 

Yeah, I've seen the reference cited as well.  It looks like it might be tough to find outside of the USGS library in Denverr or Restion (Virginia).  They closed the one near me.  I can try contacting Woodburne directly.  I don't know artifacts either. 

 

Jess

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siteseer

Here's a crocodile osteoderm from the late Cretaceous, Hell Creek Formation, Dawson County, Montana.  It's just over 2 inches long. 

 

It was collected by a member of the Franklin family who used to sell at Tucson in the 80's and 90's.  The husband and wife (Harold and Delma) have since passed away but I remember them, two of the nicest people I've ever met in my travels.

croc_osteo.jpg

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siteseer

Thanks, Harry.  Yes, Haile XiX.  I always forget the number for some reason. 

 

I bought the tooth I have from George Lee back in the 90's.  I thought it was a cool display piece.  I used to pick up crocodilian material especially when it was from places they don't live today.

 

Jess

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-Andy-

That's a monster of an osteoderm!

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Jesuslover340
46 minutes ago, -Andy- said:

That's a monster of an osteoderm!

It is! Found it upside-down and was in disbelief at how large it was!

 

Found our largest isolated Pallimnarchus tooth to date-rare as it is, and when we do find them, they're typically buggered like this one. But still-take what we can get!

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Ash

Skye didn’t mention she also found this. Diprot bone with croc bites. 

 

 

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Jesuslover340

Possible turtle jaw, @Harry Pristis?

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Harry Pristis

Turtle mandibles have foramina.  This looks like a fragmentary bivalve with the solid convex side and the delaminating convex side.

 

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Jesuslover340
1 hour ago, Harry Pristis said:

Turtle mandibles have foramina.  This looks like a fragmentary bivalve with the solid convex side and the delaminating convex side.

 

414_macroclemys_mand.thumb.JPG.308d8c3602c5daf33a82162fde1e1a98.JPG

 

We don't find fossil bivalves :unsure:

 

This is the suspected tortoise jaw it might match:

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Kiros
On 5/3/2018 at 8:26 PM, StevenJD said:

Bissekty Formation croc 

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Did you get them identified? Because I also have three crocodilomorphs teeth from bissekty. Looking for mor information I found that there are at least 4 different crocodilomorphs taxa. 

 

My biggest teeth is 4,7 cm the second 4 cm and last 2 cm

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Crocophile
On 7/27/2019 at 5:42 PM, siteseer said:

An occurrence of alligators in the Pleistocene of Oklahoma strikes me as unlikely but not impossible.  There were still alligators in Nebraska in the Late Miocene but they were rare.  Alligators can tolerate cooler temperatures than crocodiles.  Do you have locality data for that specimen?  We think of the Pleistocene as the ice Ages but during the interglacial intervals, it might have been warmer and wetter in that region than it is now.  If gar fossils are found at the site as well, it's possible.  It's a very interesting fossil.

 

Jess

Alligators are found there now in the Holocene..."bottom right corner" of the state (McCurtain County).

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LSCHNELLE

Upper Cretaceous crocodile osteoderm(?) from October 2019 in Travis County, Texas - South Bosque Member of the Eagle Ford Shale (Early to Middle Turonian). 

 

Not sure of the genus - could it be Bayomesasuchus? 

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LSCHNELLE

One more - turtle scute my wife found on our hunt in the Upper Cretaceous Corsicana marl, Travis County, Texas. 

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FF7_Yuffie

I never really got many crocs--been more of a focus on dinosaur. But, I read a book about prehistoric crocs and it got me interested in adding a few. So, recent purchases.

 

1 and 2 - An unknown croc jaw from Kem Kem

 

2  and 3 - A pair of sets of Kem Kem crocodile scutes -- I'm probably gonna get some of the assorted croc teeth and have all these displayed in a frame together with them.

 

4 - A small Theriosuchus tooth from the Hastings Beds in the UK.

 

 

I've got my eye on a few more interesting-looking croc teeth to hopefully add soon.

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