Jesuslover340

Show Us Your Croc, Gator, and Turtle Material!

175 posts in this topic

@ynot I like the cetacean vert piece! Very neat!

 

And @caterpillar, that is a beautiful piece! Do you know the species?

 

@digit Wow....that site sounds amazing! Do you get to keep any smaller finds?

 

Let me look up what Phosphatosaurus looked like...

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Here is a couple pieces of the turtle material I have. These are Oligocene Stylemys nebrascaenis turtles, the eggs are from Converse County, Wyoming and the rest of the pieces are from Pennington County, South Dakota.

 

Eggs:

IMG_0250.thumb.JPG.ef54f21d5ac7d3eda379a6888b896bb8.JPG

 

Crushed Turtle:

 

IMG_0248.thumb.JPG.89acb4bd6ad73b41278dac4dafdfe646.JPG

 

Turtle Plastron- I know I have the other side, but cannot locate right now.

 

IMG_0249.thumb.JPG.1239765a0e5352f6b4dfd838320ae161.JPG

 

Turtle internal molds with little to no shell.

 

IMG_0251.thumb.JPG.edb43473ba2bd23febcf9091f935fe20.JPG

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Here are a couple crocodile pieces. I know the two teeth in matrix are Eocene- Green River Formation, Wyoming. I believe that the two loose teeth might be Moroccan, but I have no clue on the two jaw sections. Any ID help would be appreciated.

 

Teeth- Green River Formation

 

IMG_0246.thumb.JPG.fa5c0a81270db442bd872dd3187da27f.JPG

 

Moroccan ??

 

IMG_0247.thumb.JPG.b7af4b9c01d21c70f8adccf588aad02a.JPG

 

Jaw Sections- Unknown 

 

IMG_0243.thumb.JPG.5ff116d9d4450e999646680c80c51fdb.JPGIMG_0244.thumb.JPG.818c04a0d7446e8fb8f14e8c6ffd006e.JPGIMG_0245.thumb.JPG.e840475f363bf770b102b686b1270806.JPG

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1 hour ago, Jesuslover340 said:

 

@digit Wow....that site sounds amazing! Do you get to keep any smaller finds?

 

 

Nope. But I get to keep 100% of the photos! :P

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Love the jaws above!

nice fossils, everyone!

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Some fossils are just amazing:wub:

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Some nice specimens on here. Crocodilian fossils have been hit or miss with me, found the two gator teeth at the Peace river below (2 years apart) & picked up the Gavialosuchus/ Thecachampsa tooth for a respectable $30-$35 on the bay (their skulls are quite the sight to see in person, couple small museums near bartow, Fl have a replica).

 

Those are my only gator teeth I've found so far, either don't have an eye for small ones or super hit or miss with me lol. Also weird how I found my first gator vert (smallish one I'm holding in my profile pic) before my first gator scute (yet to find). Almost anything can happen when fossiling

004 edited.jpg

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@Nimravis I like the jaw sections! 

 

@Cam28 My favorite is the rooted tooth :) Nice colors!

 

Anyone have crocodylomorph specimens?

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I bought this specimen a few weeks back. A crocodile from the Cretaceous of the Kem Kem Beds in Morocco. There are two skull parts and a cervical rib. The two skull parts consist of a left quadrate and a piece of jaw that has parts of the left premaxilla, maxilla and nasal. The cervical rib is from the right side.

 

Associated material from Kem Kem is pretty rare. And that's not all, this croc was absolutely massive. Upon looking through the literature I found that the jaw piece is a pretty exact match with Elosuchus cherifiensis. I've heard of this type of croc getting fairly big. But Not this huge. No surprise, it's related to Sarcosuchus. This animal seems to have been over twice the size of the animal from the original description. I've overlayed the pieces on the drawing of a complete skull from the publication. With some rough calculations I end up with a skull that would have been well over a metre(3.2 feet) long.

 

I'm still in the process of cleaning it.

 

20 cm bar. The jaw piece is roughly 25 cm long.

Elosuchus_skull01.jpg.be23b4a299aa309ae841122ca4d00f56.jpg

 

ede07.jpg

elosuchus01.jpg

elosuchus02.jpg

elosuchus03.jpg

elosuchus04.jpg

elosuchus05.jpg

elosuchus06.jpg

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On 4/2/2017 at 3:45 PM, LordTrilobite said:

I bought this specimen a few weeks back. A crocodile from the Cretaceous of the Kem Kem Beds in Morocco. There are two skull parts and a cervical rib. The two skull parts consist of a left quadrate and a piece of jaw that has parts of the left premaxilla, maxilla and nasal. The cervical rib is from the right side.

 

Associated material from Kem Kem is pretty rare. And that's not all, this croc was absolutely massive. Upon looking through the literature I found that the jaw piece is a pretty exact match with Elosuchus cherifiensis. I've heard of this type of croc getting fairly big. But Not this huge. No surprise, it's related to Sarcosuchus. This animal seems to have been over twice the size of the animal from the original description. I've overlayed the pieces on the drawing of a complete skull from the publication. With some rough calculations I end up with a skull that would have been well over a metre(3.2 feet) long.

 

I'm still in the process of cleaning it.

 

20 cm bar. The jaw piece is roughly 25 cm long.

Elosuchus_skull01.jpg.be23b4a299aa309ae841122ca4d00f56.jpg

 

ede07.jpg

elosuchus01.jpg

elosuchus02.jpg

elosuchus03.jpg

elosuchus04.jpg

elosuchus05.jpg

elosuchus06.jpg

:drool::drool::drool:

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Here's my latest exciting specimen (too long to detail here):

 

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Skye makes the point in the post above that crocodilian material from Australia is not common unlike the abundant material that can be found in places like the Peace River in Florida. On a two-day trip to the Peace River (day one with relatives and day two with a TFF member meet-up) we found lots of gator material (and quite a bit of turtle/tortoise too). Between the two days we found about half a dozen smaller gator teeth--including some the size of a pencil eraser. On the second day I found a bit of jaw which by the texture and the placement and size of the sockets (alveola) I assume is gator.

 

P4162306.jpg.99b7be04934093e2a698cd00f796ced6.jpg    P4162307.jpg.6efce14ccc9c7b39fb7b8d823f4835b8.jpg

 

The trip-makers for the weekend came out of the river about 20 minutes apart and were the two largest gator osteoderms I've pulled from the Peace River. They look like fossilized sundials. ;)

 

Quite made my day.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

 

P4142268.jpg.e4aa67285c352c733b14bf52462245f1.jpg    P4142269.jpg.01bbd83b28d657eeea6d67d839de7dbd.jpg

 

P4142273.jpg.1790a3d20cadcca3b8542e97afbbc5c8.jpg    P4142275.jpg.f11d1f6fbddb039dce080f3eb88a239b.jpg

 

P4162313.jpg.42a36349a6f5c9b537e904766328e1ae.jpg

 

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Very nice osteoderms!

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On 12/22/2016 at 3:37 AM, Doctor Mud said:

Hope you do. Boy imagine if some of those sockets had teeth in them.....

Just found this example of a P. pollens tooth being prepped by Scott Hocknull for the Queensland Museum-it's HUGE! :o

B5CPqHbCEAAjvxK.jpg

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1 hour ago, Jesuslover340 said:

Just found this example of a P. pollens tooth being prepped by Scott Hocknull for the Queensland Museum-it's HUGE! :o

B5CPqHbCEAAjvxK.jpg

 

By the gods! That's even bigger than most theropod teeth out there! How big did this fella get?

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I think 7 or so meters is the estimate?

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12 minutes ago, Ash said:

I think 7 or so meters is the estimate?

Estimated, but there's really not a lot of material to validate this; I believe some sources stated it might supercede Sarcosuchus as "Super Croc"...

Regardless, it had ridiculously large teeth!

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Have a couple of Deinonychus teeth coming in; will update with pics when they arrive! :D

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As promised! Two rooted Deinosuchus teeth from the Ripley Fm. of Bullock County, Alabama; Cretaceous :D

20170426_175741-1.jpg

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Deinonychus or Deinosuchus?  I will ask the same question I have asked about croc teeth labeled deinosuchus... what makes them Deinosuchus.  D was a huge animal with very big teeth.  These are not big enough to be called Deinosuchus without considering other Cretaceus crocs.    

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37 minutes ago, jpc said:

Deinonychus or Deinosuchus?  I will ask the same question I have asked about croc teeth labeled deinosuchus... what makes them Deinosuchus.  D was a huge animal with very big teeth.  These are not big enough to be called Deinosuchus without considering other Cretaceus crocs.    

Whoops! Thanks for catching that! My phone prefers Deinonychus to Deinosuchus :wacko:

I believe it's the fine to coarse 'ridges' around the tooth and serrations on the two most prominent on either side. 

@-Andy- might know more.

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5 hours ago, jpc said:

Deinonychus or Deinosuchus?  I will ask the same question I have asked about croc teeth labeled deinosuchus... what makes them Deinosuchus.  D was a huge animal with very big teeth.  These are not big enough to be called Deinosuchus without considering other Cretaceus crocs.    

 

4 hours ago, Jesuslover340 said:

Whoops! Thanks for catching that! My phone prefers Deinonychus to Deinosuchus :wacko:

I believe it's the fine to coarse 'ridges' around the tooth and serrations on the two most prominent on either side. 

@-Andy- might know more.

 

Two great teeth, Skye! Rooted too. I can see why you are proud of them.

 

JPC, you raised a good point on other Cretaceous crocs. The paleontologist studying the Ripley Formation seem to think there's only Deinosuchus teeth however. I have several dozen Deinosuchus rugosus teeth from the Chattahoochee River region of the Ripley Formations found in a dive with Dr. David R Schwimmer. Some are barely a cm long.

 

If we refer to An Overview of Late Cretaceous Vertebrates from Alabama 2013 (TAKEHITO IKEJIRI, JUN A. EBERSOLE, HARRY LYON BLEWITT, and SANDY M. EBERSOLE), they too mention the same:

 

5903d73035692_RipleyFormation.thumb.jpg.fe0173c98794ab3045ac060b1d71ca97.jpg

 

Some crocs don't tolerate other croc species in their area, e.g. nile crocodile. Perhaps a giant like Deinosuchus was the same, killing and out-competing all others.

 

 

 

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On 2/23/2017 at 4:08 PM, Cam28 said:

Some nice specimens on here. Crocodilian fossils have been hit or miss with me, found the two gator teeth at the Peace river below (2 years apart) & picked up the Gavialosuchus/ Thecachampsa tooth for a respectable $30-$35 on the bay (their skulls are quite the sight to see in person, couple small museums near bartow, Fl have a replica).

 

Those are my only gator teeth I've found so far, either don't have an eye for small ones or super hit or miss with me lol. Also weird how I found my first gator vert (smallish one I'm holding in my profile pic) before my first gator scute (yet to find). Almost anything can happen when fossiling

004 edited.jpg

I've just recently seen this skull (a photo, at least)-very neat animal! I wish more research was done on it...Proud owner of a humble tooth from Bone Valley :)

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48 minutes ago, -Andy- said:

 

 

Two great teeth, Skye! Rooted too. I can see why you are proud of them.

 

JPC, you raised a good point on other Cretaceous crocs. The paleontologist studying the Ripley Formation seem to think there's only Deinosuchus teeth however. I have several dozen Deinosuchus rugosus teeth from the Chattahoochee River region of the Ripley Formations found in a dive with Dr. David R Schwimmer. Some are barely a cm long.

 

If we refer to An Overview of Late Cretaceous Vertebrates from Alabama 2013 (TAKEHITO IKEJIRI, JUN A. EBERSOLE, HARRY LYON BLEWITT, and SANDY M. EBERSOLE), they too mention the same:

 

5903d73035692_RipleyFormation.thumb.jpg.fe0173c98794ab3045ac060b1d71ca97.jpg

 

Some crocs don't tolerate other croc species in their area, e.g. nile crocodile. Perhaps a giant like Deinosuchus was the same, killing and out-competing all others.

 

 

 

Thanks! I haven't seen many rooted Deinosuchus teeth, let alone Deinosuchus teeth in general.

 

And learned something new! Very eager to learn more about this creature...I've watched the PaleoWorld documentary that speaks of them and even cheated in watching the National Geographic documentary on Sarcosuchus (which I don't have...yet...). Waiting for the book on Deinosuchus to come in (I'm a book reader; have to read all I can about an exciting acquisition)!

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On 2/22/2017 at 8:39 PM, Nimravis said:

Here are a couple crocodile pieces. I know the two teeth in matrix are Eocene- Green River Formation, Wyoming. I believe that the two loose teeth might be Moroccan, but I have no clue on the two jaw sections. Any ID help would be appreciated.

 

Teeth- Green River Formation

 

IMG_0246.thumb.JPG.fa5c0a81270db442bd872dd3187da27f.JPG

 

Moroccan ??

 

IMG_0247.thumb.JPG.b7af4b9c01d21c70f8adccf588aad02a.JPG

 

Jaw Sections- Unknown 

 

IMG_0243.thumb.JPG.5ff116d9d4450e999646680c80c51fdb.JPGIMG_0244.thumb.JPG.818c04a0d7446e8fb8f14e8c6ffd006e.JPGIMG_0245.thumb.JPG.e840475f363bf770b102b686b1270806.JPG

The teeth from Wyoming-Borealosuchus, maybe? Just recently came across a specimen of one and it came from the Green River Fm. of Wyoming.

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