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Fossil-Hound

The Virginia Aquarium & Marine Science Center

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Fossil-Hound

Had a blast last weekend visiting The Virginia Aquarium & Marine Science Center. There is a ton of stuff there that's really worth checking out and I noticed an assortment of fossils. The first picture is a crinoid head.

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Fossil-Hound

Triassic era fish most likely from Madagascar according to inside sources *cough* @Fossildude19 *cough*

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Fossil-Hound

Stromatolites helped to form our earths oxygen rich atmosphere during the Pre-Cambrian as their cellular respiratory by-product is oxygen.

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Fossil-Hound

Tree ferns. These are very common in north eastern Pennsylvania.

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Fossil-Hound

A Triassic (dinosaur aged) shrimp.

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Fossil-Hound

No museum is complete without a pristine trilobite. I'm not exactly sure what this species is known as but I have seen them around. Notice the nice preparation work that has been done around the fossil.

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Fossil-Hound

One of my favorite fossils, and the envy of many is the Eurypterid. There are only a few places in the world where these are found: New York, Ontario, and the Ukraine. I would absolutely love to get my hands on one of these and may just have to save up my pennies to purchase one as I don't have a lot of spare time to go out and hunt for these rarities.

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Fossil-Hound

Beautiful crinoid specimen.

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Fossil-Hound

This is an Ammonite. Notice the many chambers. Scientists theorize that the Ammonite used these chambers to trap gases to control it's buoyancy in the water, similar to how it's predecessor the modern day Nautilus does.

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Fossil-Hound

Dinosaur footprint. I would absolutely love to find one of these.

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Fossil-Hound

This is a cephalopod. I've found a few of these from Penn Dixie, but this one is pristine.

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Fossil-Hound

Part of a tree.

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Fossil-Hound

A view of a Devonian seabed teeming with life.

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Fossil-Hound

I believe this is the Pre-Cambrian.

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Fossil-Hound

Here is a modern day cephalopod, the octopus.

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Fossil-Hound

Sea turtle have been around since the early Cretaceous and survived the massive extinction that wiped out the dinosaurs. If the earth was hit in the Yucatan by a massive asteroid, how did these Chelonioidea reptiles survive? This is a loggerhead, in a turtle nursery.

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Fossil-Hound

Another view.

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Fossil-Hound

Massive shark teeth showcasing various sharks. The jaws might be real, but the single teeth are not as they are enlarged to show detail. The tooth on the right is from a great white, but would make for a killer foot long C. Megalodon tooth if it where real.

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Fossil-Hound

Corals have been around for a long time, ever since the Cambrian. I used to own a saltwater aquarium, and that's what helped me get into marine paleontology. Very neat stuff.

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Fossil-Hound

This is a Sandbar shark. I recently read an article indicating that juvenile Sandbars are preyed upon by Sand Tiger sharks.

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Fossil-Hound

Crazy to think that all of the aforementioned sea-life both past and present can be found in central and northeaster USA, and the Atlantic ocean. Here I am at Cape Henry, Virginia where the first settlers of the USA landed.

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ynot

Cool report, thanks for sharing.

Tony

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Fossildude19
12 hours ago, jsnrice said:

Triassic era fish from Virginia.

 

This is actually a Triassic fish from Madagascar. ;) 

The Trilobite is a Dalmanites limulurus, probably from the Rochester Shale in NY.

The scale tree is a Lepidodendron sp

Thanks for the field trip. :) 

Regards,

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Al Dente
11 hours ago, jsnrice said:

Crazy to think that all of the aforementioned sea-life both past and present can be found in central and northeaster USA, and the Atlantic ocean. Here I am at Cape Henry, Virginia where the first settlers of the USA landed.

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Nice report. There are always myths surrounding the first visitors to the New World and the area that became the US. Southern colonization has been ignored by many older history books. The Spanish had been in Florida almost a hundred years by this time of the Jamestown Colony. An English colony had come and gone in North Carolina 20 years earlier. Of course it was already populated by Native Americans for millennia. 

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Fossil-Hound
11 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

 

This is actually a Triassic fish from Madagascar. ;) 

The Trilobite is a Dalmanites limulurus, probably from the Rochester Shale in NY.

The scale tree is a Lepidodendron sp

Thanks for the field trip. :) 

Regards,

 

@Fossildude19 How do you know it's from Madagascar? I thought that bug looked familiar from somewhere. :D You're very welcome.

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