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Rustdee

Dromaeosaur tooth?

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Rustdee

Hi all,

 

I found this tooth in a locality where the formations of the Black Creek Group are present in Eastern North Carolina. The Black Creek Group contains the Tar Heel Formation, the Bladen Formation, and the Donoho Creek Formation. These formations are late Cretaceous and range from early Campanian to early Maastrichtian. Dinosaur fossils are known from this locality, including hadrosaurs, tyrannosaurs, and dromaeosaurs. This locality primarily preserves marine fossils, such as shark teeth and crocodile teeth and bones, but also dinosaur material.

 

There are serrations on the tooth, however, I am not sure my camera can capture those. I believe that I need a different lens for that much magnification. Would love to hear thoughts about this tooth. I would be happy to provide any additional photos or information that may be missing.

 

Thanks!

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ynot

Nice tooth!

@Troodon would probably ask for a serration per cm count on this.

Tony

PS Sorry I can not help with You question.

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Rustdee

Hi Tony,

 

Thanks for the reply and compliment!

 

I am a bit embarrassed to say that I do not have a metric ruler nearby at the moment. I will get one tomorrow. There are still serrations present. Unfortunately, they are very worn. I will give it a go at counting them. Hopefully my eyes are up for the task!

 

Best,

Dan

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ynot

You can use an inch scale, just use 1/8th inch for Your count.

Tony

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Rustdee

Thanks. I believe that I can make out 11 or 12 serrations for the 1/8 inch scale. I will count again tomorrow and see if I get the same number.

 

For clarification, the serration count is for the serrations inside the curve of the tooth. I am not sure I will be able to count the serrations on the outside, as there seems to be too much wear.

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JohnJ

Two of Frank's topics that may help...

 

Troodon teeth

 

Theropod teeth

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Al Dente

Nice find.

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Canadawest

Excellent and rare find.

 

Its a theropod tooth. Best not to get overly diagnostic without other associated specimens.  Measuring serrations, etc. is fun to do but is tentative in confirmation. Its best to consult a list of  the theropods named in the 'published' research paper of the fauna in the formation and tentatively identify it as on of those (such as Dromeosaur).

 

Where there is one there is likely another!  In our rich Cretaceous deposits raptor teeth are usually found among specimens of turtle, croc, fish, non marine gastropods, etc. The distinct recurved teeth catch the eye among other stuff.  

 

Just a note.  We likely find a dozen shed hadrosaur and ceratopsian teeth for every raptor tooth.  These may be less than a cm in length and, unless oriented the right way, will be overlooked.  Its good to get a handle at what these look like (and not the complete teeth you often see in photos).

 

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sixgill pete

Rustdee, great find. In NC any raptor tooth is exceptionally rare. I would call your tooth Dromadaeosauridae indet.  I do not believe there has been any ID to genus or species level for this family for finds here in North Carolina. I would also encourage you to think about donating this tooth to the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences as they do not have a Dromaeosauridae tooth from North Carolina in their collections and this could be an extremely scientifically important find for dinosaur science in our state. 

 

Again, fantastic find.

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DE&i

Stunning find , neat and compact.

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Rustdee

Thanks everyone! Troodon that is probably the best I can get with my current camera equipment. I need to look into getting some better magnification tools.

 

Also, thanks for the suggestion sixgill! I will look into the NC museum; I hate to say that I haven't been there in about 10 years. 

 

This is very exciting! :dinothumb:

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RickNC

Awesome tooth and congrats!

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TNCollector

Nice tooth!! Of the thousands of shark teeth that I have collected in the Cretaceous of MS, I have only found one and a half dinosaur teeth (both hadrosaurs). They are very rare here in the Southeast as most were deposited during "float and bloat" situations in the open sea.

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zekky

Right shape for dromaeosaur but without a close up of the serrations it's hard to tell. Interesting texture to the tooth, looks flutted. I wonder if that's just wear or morphology. As of right now I agree with Troodon, stick with theropod. Awesome tooth, I'm quite jealous.

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