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Brett Breakin' Rocks

(Canid?) Mammal Tooth ID - Late Miocene

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Brett Breakin' Rocks

Hello Everyone,

  

  I was curious about a beautiful small tooth that popped into my sifter near Summerville , SC.  My assumption is from the Late Miocene ? Hawthorne Formation.  I'm not very versed in mammal teeth quite yet.  Is this a canid ... small fox, or wolf ? ... premolar ? These images are scans of the tooth. I have been scanning any information and images that I can find but it looks too small for a wolf and doesn't have the right chewing surfaces.

 

  Thanks of course in advance. @Harry Pristis ... maybe you have an idea, I know you are well versed in this area.

 

 

SummervilleSC_Tooth.jpg

 

 

Cheers,

Brett

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Harry Pristis

What a cool tooth!  I don't recognize the donor.  Let us know when you identify it.

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fifbrindacier

A guess in the wilde : Coyote ?

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gavialboy

i am no expert, but it could  be a otter tooth. what ever it is it is still a very cool find so congrats 

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Brett Breakin' Rocks
12 hours ago, Harry Pristis said:

What a cool tooth!  I don't recognize the donor.  Let us know when you identify it.

 

9 hours ago, fifbrindacier said:

A guess in the wilde : Coyote ?

 

23 minutes ago, sorzano95 said:

i am no expert, but it could  be a otter tooth. what ever it is it is still a very cool find so congrats 

 

  I'm leaning toward some sort of dog/fox/coyote but with the time periods involved and the formations that are present I will be looking closely at when those animals' ancestors were just showing up on the scene.  I'll check out the otter too .. I'm pretty sure it's not a rodent and is not feline.

 

Thanks,

B

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digit

I second Harry's opinion--What a tooth! If it is not one that Harry is familiar with you know it has to be special. :)

 

The size is about right (I believe) for something like a raccoon premolar. Small mammal teeth are such rare finds in the Peace River that I have little experience with them and could only hazard a guess.

 

Will be interesting to see if any other TFF members have seen something similar and can make a match. Failing that, I'd contact Dr. Richard Hulbert at FLMNH and see what he can make of it.

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Brett Breakin' Rocks
3 hours ago, Harry Pristis said:

I don't think it's a canid, certainly not a coyote.  Here an otter jaw for comparison:

otter_teeth_drawing.JPG

ottermandible.JPG

Thanks Harry, this is great .. I thought it was going to be a quick identification !  I appreciate the help and the insight.

 

B

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siteseer
20 hours ago, Brett Breakin' Rocks said:

Hello Everyone,

  

  I was curious about a beautiful small tooth that popped into my sifter near Summerville , SC.  My assumption is from the Late Miocene ? Hawthorne Formation.  I'm not very versed in mammal teeth quite yet.  Is this a canid ... small fox, or wolf ? ... premolar ? These images are scans of the tooth. I have been scanning any information and images that I can find but it looks too small for a wolf and doesn't have the right chewing surfaces.

 

  Thanks of course in advance. @Harry Pristis ... maybe you have an idea, I know you are well versed in this area.

 

 

Cheers,

Brett

 

 

Collectors find fossils from the Chandler Bridge Formation (Late Oligocene marine) in the Summerville area as well.  What else did you find with that tooth?  It looks raccoon-like. 

 

 

 

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Brett Breakin' Rocks
1 hour ago, siteseer said:

 

 

Collectors find fossils from the Chandler Bridge Formation (Late Oligocene marine) in the Summerville area as well.  What else did you find with that tooth?  It looks raccoon-like. 

 

 

 

Sorry, I should have clarified .... In this particular stretch these are the common/uncommon finds. Predominantly marine, Megs, Angustidens, 'Mako' ,Great White, Hemi ... etc.  Yes, it could be older with these associated Angustidens. Thanks for taking a look.

chart.jpg

 

01_Summerville_SC_Angy_Small.jpg

 

01_Summerville_SC_Assorted_121016.jpg

 

01_Summerville_SC_Frag_Small.jpg

01_Summerville_SC_Tiger_Small.jpg

02_Summerville_SC_Hemi_Small.jpg

 

Thanks.

 

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