tstark

Stumped!

8 posts in this topic

So this came to me in in pieces and it was been repaired and I still have no ideas or what it could be.  All I know is thats is from morocco (unknown region),  it looks to have "suckers" on the end of the piece which throws me.  I have had the thought of a marine plant root of some kind.  Thanks for the help!-1.jpg

-2.jpg

-3.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A heteromorph ammonite.

2 people finds this informative

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with pfooley, a heteromorph ammonite.

Nice one too!

Tony

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks for the quick answers and help. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of us steered this kind of course when we were young :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a little uncertain about this one being a heteromorph ammonite.  First, the straight shaft seems to have chambers, but if those really are chambers their edges (suture lines) look to be straight across, as you would see in a nautiloid not an ammonite.  Perhaps a closer picture would resolve the question.

 

Also the smaller diameter shaft is oddly irregular.  There are heteromorphs that have a number of straight shafts that are connected by hairpin turns, such as Diplomoceras or Polyptychoceras, and there are heteromorphic ammonites and also nautiloids that start with a normal planispiral shell that then straightens out; Baculites and Litulites would be examples.  However I am unaware of any cephalopods that start with such an irregular, vaguely twisty whorl and then transition via a hairpin curve to a perfectly straight shaft.  Has anyone seen this growth form before?

 

Don

1 person finds this informative

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never seen something like this before. I'm leaning to a compound element as you suggest, Don. :headscratch:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have some bizarre heteromorph ammonites (likely new species) from the Turonian of Texas.  So, unusual morphology doesn't bother me too much.  However, I agree with Don that better images or direct observation of complex sutures would help confirm an ammonite.  Possible causes for the weird shape could be incorrect assembly during prep, a broken ammonite prepped in a way that makes it seem new, or a pathological specimen.

1 person finds this informative

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.