Jump to content

Hawthorne Group question


OptimusShev

Recommended Posts

I have a question. So I live in Florida, and looking a the map I am attaching I live in the Hawthorne Group. So.... if I dig in a creek am I likely to find fossils? I'm trying to look at these geological maps and distinguish areas which are likely to yield fossils. Particularly shark teeth. Can anyone school me up in this department? Thank you!!

IMG_0442.PNG

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I heard that in florida, you don't find sharkteeth, they find you!:hearty-laugh:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Much of the Hawthorn is unfossiliferous, but there are fossiliferous horizons.  It's always worth having a look, but you can't automatically assume shark teeth will be jumping in your screen.

 

Don

Link to post
Share on other sites

If I was doing prospecting for fossil sites I would try and get my hands on a higher resolution map.

These might be available online via USGS? These maps can give a better idea of the local stratigraphy and where layers outcrop or are incised by rivers.

 

The map you show gives a good regional overview and the general area that you could look in. Sounds like from what Don says there is a lot of variability within mapped units and you just have to get out there and explore - which is part of the fun.

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Depending where exactly you live.. your best bet is to go to that creek and do some digging. Not all of Florida will produce shark teeth but a good part of it will produce some sort of fossil if you do enough digging.

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't go by the maps.I regularly go to an area that is meant to be prolific for sharks teeth,however,I have only ever found a few!!I have found other things are more exciting,however.Go by experience.

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

You might consider joining the nearest Fossil/Mineral/gem club, to get to know more like minded people in your area, and take advantage of field trips they run. 

LINK

Good luck. 

Regards,

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you go to local small museums they will also have details of where items have been found,or Google local areas + fossils and see what else comes up other than this great site.

Edited by Yvie
Missed word:
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone! I visited two small creeks after work today. One was all clay and some shells, the other was sand as deep as my  prodding stick will go. I must say, I enjoyed the exploring though. I had to use my shovel to help me get through the thick brush and flora. Also kept my head on a swivel looking for gators and snakes! Tomorrow after work I have anouther place I will try. If anyone has any more tips of the trade it would be helpful. I've googled a lot and searched this forum for hours getting ideas on what to look for, but any advice it  appreciated.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...